Monochrome

Black and white wedding in Glacier National ParkOn of my favorite things with weddings is to go back and pick out photos to re-edit in black and white. When I started out in photography (in 1996) I started on black and white film. Tmax. Tri-X. We used bulk loaders to fill reusable film canisters and chemicals like Dektol and Stop bath and Fixer. One of these days I have to write about my mentor, Tim Webb, who opened my eyes to photography and the amazing world that goes with it. I am always so grateful.

I now shoot everything digitally. Part of this is related to being a newspaper photographer. Newspapers embraced digital early and didn’t look back. Even before the technology was as good as it is now, digital gave the media a new and incredible speed, and journalism loves that. But even though I have no wish to switch back to film, I still love the look of black and white. And so, when I have finished photographing a wedding, I go back through the images and choose favorites (mostly from the portraits) that I believe would be (dare I say) better in black and white. I love color. But monochrome…it will always have a place in my heart.

For Armed Forces Day I was lucky enough to photograph a soldier and his bride in Glacier National Park. To see the color photos from this, you can check out the blog I wrote before this (http://www.brendaahearn.com/glacier-wedding). I would never want to photograph a wedding on black and white film or with digital in black and white mode. Once you make that choice, the color information is lost. But I’ll happily spend the time with color files to convert them to grayscale and re-tone them. Black and white is elegant and has its own magic. It’s worth the extra time and trouble, and so far, my clients seem to love it. It’s something extra I get to give to them and it connects me to my own photography roots. Win/win.

I’m attaching some comparisons here, black and white vs. color. I have to admit, it’s not entirely a fair comparison, the day of this wedding we had incredibly overcast skies that were hours away from a complete downpour. That made for some wonderful soft light at noon, but it also meant that the colors don’t “pop” the same way they normally do. Still, the side-by-sides show the way black and white really focuses in on the composition of a frame. I love monochrome for this reason.

black and white wedding dress

mother of the bride and bride at Lake McDonald

first kiss in Glacier National Park

Glacier National Park, Lake McDonald wedding on Armed Forces Day

Lake McDonald Lodge wedding day, bride and bouquet

A soldier and his bride and their wedding in Glacier

Montan Veterans Home chapel Army wedding

Montana Veterans Home chapel Army wedding

black and white wedding photos

Glacier Wedding

Glacier National Park wedding

May is a risky month for weddings in Montana. Some days are warm and sunny, some are cold and beautiful, and a lot of days are rainy and dower. There is little in May that can be described as predictable. So it’s touchy scheduling wedding May weddings. The simple truth is, you never know what you are going to get.

Armed Forces Day weddingA few days ago I photographed the wedding of my friend Collin and his bride Miss Liz. We had a perfect day in Glacier National Park with soft light and overcast but dry skies. We didn’t get the dramatic light and bold colors we were all hoping for, but neither did we get doused and that was a win for everyone.

It was the day before that was craziness…

bride and mother

On Friday I was on the phone with both Collin and Liz. I wanted to make sure they didn’t need any last minute details taken care of by me. When I called Miss Liz she was tied in knots about the weather and the predictions for an incoming storm. She didn’t want to cause problems for anyone of the guest, but neither did she want to give up her dream of getting married in Glacier.

Lake McDonald, Glacier National Park wedding

For my part, the answer was pretty obvious, go with Glacier. Even if we get rained on. Even if it isn’t what you dreamed of. Buy umbrellas (they bought a dozen clear umbrellas) and go for Glacier and hope for the best.

Armed Forces Day wedding

And the best is what they got. They had there ceremony on the banks of Lake McDonald, bright flowers at the Lodge added a touch of color, and the overcast skies made taking photos at 1230 in the afternoon not a complete photography nightmare. And, as an added bonus, the couple decided to hold two ceremonies. One at Glacier, and then a second at their wedding reception for the people who couldn’t get to the park. More photo ops for me.  😉

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I so love that one of the reasons they considered not going to Glacier was out of concern for me and my gear. I am also outrageously happy I was able to tell both these wonderful people that I was good to go and we should take the chance on the mountains and the park.

And it worked. The gamble paid off.

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One moment I will not soon forget was driving home from the reception, looking south and seeing the storm front moving in. The rains kindly waited until this wedding day was complete. It makes a photographer smile…

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography wedding dress

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

here comes the bride

best man

Lake McDonald wedding

with this ring

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

groomsmen

bridesmaids

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Glacier National Park wedding

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Montana Veterans Home chapel

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Montana Veterans Home chapel

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Montana Veterans Home chapel

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Photographing the Northern Lights

Northern Lights over Upper Stillwater LakeBefore moving to Montana I had never seen the Northern Lights. The first time I saw them was because I got a text from a friend at the Flathead County Sheriff’s Office: “Northern Lights over Big Mountain.” That came through a little after midnight. I got up, raced out and started shooting. Mesmerizing. That’s what the Lights are. They sway and pulse and dance across the sky in colors and beats that are wildly beautiful and unpredictable.

Tonight I woke up at 1:39 a.m. and noticed the particular shade of green that indicates that outside the lights of the city, the Northern Lights are putting on a show. In a matter of minutes I had my keys, clothes, camera and tripod and was starting up the Jeep. The question is where to go…

If you have never seen the Northern Lights in Montana go to Glacier National Park. The dock at Apgar is one of the best viewing spots there is. One, it’s Glacier (you can never go wrong there). Two, you’ll have the benefit of the frequently smooth as glass Lake McDonald. Three, there are no annoying city lights or power lines to contend with. Four, there is that famous silhouetted horizon the mountains at the east end of the lake. It really is quite perfect.

Aurora Borealis over Glacier

A view of the Northern Lights over Lake McDonald at 11:56 p.m. on Thursday, April 9, in Glacier National Park. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Last year I took this photo of the lights from Apgar. The picture was a complete surprise and people responded to it in a way I never expected. So tonight I was faced with the question of whether or not to return to Apgar. The location is perfection, but would it be really any different than the last time I photographed there? It’s Saturday night, one of the nights when people can be out photographing the Lights and then sleep in the next day, so I knew I wouldn’t be alone if I went to Glacier. And one of the things I wanted was a shot different from what everyone else would be getting.

Years ago I was at a photography workshop and one of the photographers there was a shooter for National Geographic. He wasn’t a teacher, he was on a personal retreat and he didn’t talk too much. But I noticed the way he deliberately moved away from the crowd. He avoided the obvious shot and would hike much further to get something unique. In one of the few times I was brave enough to talk to him, he mentioned that he hated it when people followed him. He didn’t want to be copied, he wanted to find his own images and wanted other people to find what would speak to them. When I was a young photographer I didn’t really understand this. It made sense to me to follow him, after all, he knew what he was doing. Now that I’m a pro, I understand better. There is something powerful and magical about going you’re own way to find your own view. What you find may not match the perfection of the well known, but it will be your own. I wanted that tonight.

So, two roads: I could go with what I knew would work, or I could take off on an adventure and simply hope for the best. I went with the second option and it was so worth it.

Northern Lights over Upper Stillwater LakeInstead of going to Glacier I drove north of US 93. There is a lake called Upper Stillwater and it’s the name that made me want to seek it out. I wanted the reflection to double the effect of the Lights. I’ve seen photos of the Northern Lights from latitudes in the 50s and 60s. And the farther north a person is, the more the Lights seem to fill the entire sky. One day I hope to travel in those regions and see the Lights the way I have seen them photographed. From Montana, (based solely on my own experiences) the lights seem to pretty well hug the north/east horizon.

Since the lights aren’t going to overwhelm the sky here like they do up north, when I go looking to photograph them I go looking for north facing water. It’s not the easiest thing to find in the pitch black dark of night. But when you do find it, the water becomes a mirror. That’s what I’m looking for, that’s the shot I want.

Northern Lights over Upper Stillwater LakeIt is fascinating to stand alone in the dark surrounded by the sounds of the night under the light of the stars. In the coolness of the predawn hours my overactive imagination goes wild with fears of bears and wolves and mountain lions. But even those fears heighten the experience and make me feel more alive. When the Lights are out the stars create points of stillness that accentuate the speed of the solar winds pushing the lights across the sky. The sky dances and it is lovely.

These photos were taken with a Nikon D600 and a 17-35mm f2.8 lens at ISO 640 and exposed for 25-30 seconds. The location is the bridge over Upper Stillwater. What a spectacular night, what a perfect way to begin Mother’s Day.

Northern Lights over Upper Stillwater Lake

Northern Lights over Upper Stillwater Lake

Northern Lights over Upper Stillwater Lake

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Northern Lights over Upper Stillwater Lake

Aurora Borealis, the Northern Lights

Northern Lights over Sunday Lake, near Stryker, Montana

Art and Fear

“When your work is counted, will it be counted as art?…Acceptance and approval are powers held by others.”
— From Art and Fear.
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There in a great and terrible power in the negative voice.

Why are criticisms so much easier to believe than compliments? When someone says something kind, I smile, say thank you, and go on my merry way — grateful, but forgetful. But say one negative thing, even without malice, and I find myself coming back to those hurtful words over and over again. I feel like an oyster desperately trying to protect myself form the irritation of a tiny grain of sand. Maybe all this would be easier if I thought at the end of it, I would at least have earned a pearl of wisdom, but it doesn’t seem to work that way. The pain and suffering seem useless, futile.
I have the perfect example for this. Six months ago I posted a video slideshow to my Facebook page (the photos in this post are a few of the shots from that slideshow). I got a huge response to this. I’m not a famous photographer so my numbers might be lackluster in the eyes of some, but to a mostly-anonymous photographer in the middle of nowhere Montana, the numbers created by this video far outmatched anything I’ve created before or since.
If you want to see the video and have a Facebook account, here is the link:
Here is what this video did for me.
More than 1000 likes to my Facebook page in about a month. That was a nice ego boost.
2,536 people reacted to the video.
7,997 people shared it.
197,594 people watched it.
I got hundreds of comments from people. Most consisted of simple things like: “Wow,” “Beautiful,” and “Thank you.” And everyone one of these made me smile, made me grateful.
But a lot of the comments were more personal. I now have a Facebook friend who follows my work from France and comments in French (a language I sadly can’t speak — thank God for google translator). Her comments are so encouraging and because they’re in a foreign language, each one is like a delightful treat.
A woman who lives in Costa Rica offered to let me stay at her place if I ever wanted to come down and photograph that country. Wow.
For the slideshow I matched the photos with the song “Bury Me in Montana” by singer/songwriter Mike Murray. The song is incredible and is on his album Tumbleweed which you can find on iTunes at: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/tumbleweed/id1008787372 (it’s track number 11 the Alternative version). Some people who viewed the video really connected with their grief and I got comments from people about lost loved ones and how this video touched them and was a comfort to them. I am an artist who has lost both of her parents, so these types of comments were dearest to my heart.
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Some comments people wrote:
“Absolutely wonderful, Brenda, thank you for this beautiful work of love! Makes me miss Montana all the more! I will share this, too gorgeous not to! Blessings to you!”
“Your work is beautiful. Being a lapsed photographer I do know the hours that went into your presentation. Keep going with your passion you have a real talent.”
“Brenda your photography is insanely good!! What you capture through the lens is gorgeous. If you words don’t make it into some kind of printed compilation it will be a shame. Beautiful work!”
Who wouldn’t want to get comments like these? And there are hundreds of them. So much good. So many kind people. So many expressions of love and gratitude.
And yet…
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Of course, it isn’t all perfect or kind. There is one person in particular who couldn’t be kind a wrote a comment that started off with “I’m sorry” (because if you’re going to insult someone you should always start with an apology.) “I’m sorry but…” she basically said that she was sorry but she felt compelled to point out that my photography really isn’t all that good. She went on to link to another photographer’s Facebook page as an example of what a “real” artist can do.
I didn’t respond.
I mean really, what is there to say?
“Thank you.” Nope. Not grateful.
“The photographer you admire sucks.” Nope. I don’t need to go on the attack.
I could acknowledge how much she hurt me, but why give her that kind of power?
So, I said nothing. I ignored the comment and since this was six months ago, I couldn’t get back to it to find it if I had to. After all this time, after thousands of joyful, positive, enthusiastic, great, amazing, heart-warming, inspiring, edifying, uplifting, unique, thoughtful, and gratitude-inducing moments that have come from this video there is still only one comment that I remember clearly, and it’s the negative one. One negative voice, in a sea of compliments, and that is the voice I hold onto.
Why is that?

Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake A sunrise view of Reynolds Mountain over an alpine meadow on Thursday, September 13, in Glacier National Park.

After the deaths of my parents I remember finding a beautiful little poem that I memorized and have remembered now for 15 years. He wrote:
“Our joys as winged dreams do fly,
Why then should sorry last?
Since grief but aggravates thy loss,
Grieve not for what is past.”
Sunrise Over Dickey Lake
A few weeks ago I read a great little book that has been helpful and challenging. It’s called Art and Fear: Observations on the Perils (and Rewards) of Making Art by David Bayles and Ted Orland.
There are so many great quotes in this book, I took pages of notes while reading it. But for the purpose of this blog I am going to end with three. These are the three things I am trying to remember, trying to hold onto and learn instead of getting wrapped around that negative voice.
“Making the work you want to make means finding your nourishment within the work itself.”
“The viewer’s concerns are not your concerns. Their job is whatever it is: to be moved by art, to be entertained by it, to make a killing off it, whatever. Your job is to learn to work on your work.”
“Catering to fears of being misunderstood…you discard your own highest vision in the process.”
Colorful Sunrise
I’m going to hold on to what was worth holding onto from this experience. I am going to hold onto the people who wrote with love and kindness in their hearts and who touched my life and left me feeling alive, and appreciated, and so very grateful. This has been a bit of a challenge, but the work should always be a challenge. My mentor (and best friend) always used to quote Tom Hanks from the movie A League of Their Own.
“It’s supposed to be hard. If it wasn’t hard, everyone would do it. The hard is what makes it great.”
Whatever else my life ends up being, it certainly has offered moments that  were truly great. Every bit of challenge has been worthwhile.

A view of the Northern Lights over Lake McDonald at 11:56 p.m. on Thursday, April 9, in Glacier National Park. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

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(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

North Fork Buck

Blue Sky Morning

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2010 Looking Back

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Trumpeter Swans on Flathead Lake

Spring Thaw comes to Lake McDonald

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See what a difference 18 minutes can make…

This is my favorite photo of the sunset last night at City Beach, Whitefish, Montana.
b20160315city_beach_0995But the night didn’t start off looking like this. It started off with some great clouds and good light, but the very tip of the mountain was shaded. This is what it started off as…
b20160315city_beach_0876This first photo of the night isn’t ‘bad.’ But it isn’t anything I would normally post. I am only adding this to show the difference that 18 minutes can make.

Photography is a waiting game. You see the light, you see the clouds, you go. You find your location and you wait. In the wind, and the cold, you sit on some rock and wait and hope. You hope that as the sun continues to drop eventually it is going to strike the top of Big Mountain. And the clouds will light up with color. And you know that if you’ll just wait you will have a chance at getting so incredibly lucky, or you’ll get nothing but colder.

The days that are hardest are the ones when the light doesn’t quite do what you need it to, and you walk away with photos that are just “meh.”
Eighteen minutes. Biting cold. Shivering in the wind. The sound of the water making me feel even colder. Battling doubt as the minutes creep by and wondering, ‘am I wasting my time out here?’ And then at the very end of sunset the last, most colorful light, struck the top of Big Mountain and just like that — Boom! — worth it.
Absolutely and unquestionably worth the wait.
Patience is always a virtue, but that is especially true in photography. In that 18 minutes most of the people who beat me to this location packed up and left. They didn’t see the finale.
I wish I could say that every time I wait and watch I get rewarded, but that isn’t true. A lot of the time, I just get cold. But I always know there is this chance for pure delight. And even when I don’t get it, I don’t regret it. I guess the simple truth is, it’s always worthwhile — photos or no — because it restores my soul.

Here are the in between photos. Enjoy.

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The Big Mountain Location Challenge

Big Mountain from downtown Whitefish at dawn.

Big Mountain from downtown Whitefish at dawn.

This post is really going to only apply to people who have some connection to the Flathead Valley. I need help with a project and I’m getting desperate. So I have decided create this Big Mountain Location Challenge. The winner will get a complimentary 16×20 print of either the photo they made possible, or any of my other photographs that they wish.

Here’s the back story:

It’s hard to believe this started at least two years ago. I have a friend who loves my photography. He has consistently purchased aluminum prints to decorate his house and I’m honored. As friendship has grown and changed over the years he’s gone from picking photos that I’ve taken to hang on his wall, to giving me assignments. I’m basically making custom artwork for him. He’s from Montana, so when he told me has this mental image of the Swan range at sunset, he’s not really talking about the view he saw from his living room window growing up, he’s talking about a lifetime of seeing and loving those mountains. And so I get to go out, drive around, scout for locations and then wait until the weather is perfect to go and try to capture his vision. It’s hard enough to be working on my own artistic vision of a scene, but add to that the challenge of taking a modern photograph that somehow captures a lifetime of memories and associations…it’s not easy. But it is worthwhile.

In my personal photography work the only person I am shooting for, and the only person I have to please, is me. If others like what I create, great. If not, oh well. Trying to capture someone’s predetermined mental image is vastly different than shooting for myself. But like Tom Hanks said in A League of Their Own, “It’s the hard that makes it great.”

After many attempts I got the Swan Range photo. The challenge I am currently working on is Big Mountain with the ski lights on. I shot this a bit last year, but none of those were quite what was wanted. This week I went to dinner with this guy and his family and I got the not so subtle hint that the lights on the mountain are on again on Saturdays and Sundays (what we was actually saying is: “Get back to work”). Skiing with the lights on is significant to him because of the memories it provokes of time with his wife and kids and maybe even times from when he was a kid skiing under those lamps. The weight of the nostalgia connected to this mental image of his, is only adding to challenge for me.

I went out for sunrise this morning, because it turns out the lights are on for dawn as well. Yeah, more changes for me. But I am still not finding the ideal location.

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So, if anyone reading this has a suggestion for the perfect location from which to photograph the ski lights and Big Mountain please message me via Facebook. I will need to scout the location in the day time and then randomly show up there when the light is right. If you have a friend or family with property on the lake, or a vast field that looks across to the mountain, or whatever, I want to see it. If your location creates the photograph that finally gets the approval of my most persnickety friend, then I will give you a 16×20 photograph of either the photo you made possible, or any of my other photographs that you may prefer. Please message me if you are interested in submitting a location.

The first person to submit a location gets it, so if you have more than one idea, mail them in. Two, I am NOT the person who will be deciding this. He is. And honestly, I never have a clue what this guy is going to choose.

Thank you in advance!

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2015 Year in Review: part one – Photojournalism

View from atop the Evergreen Fire and Rescue ladder truck of a fire on Mountain View Drive in Evergreen on Wednesday, August 5. The helicopter is from the Department of Natural Resources and Conservation. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake) (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

It would be difficult to pick a non-fire related photo to start with because the 2015 fire season was one for the record books. This is from the massive Evergreen fire in August.

Welcome to a brand new year! In true procrastinator style I have waited for the end of 2015 to write up my reflections on the year. In my defense, I don’t really feel my year is over. Personally, I have always counted my birthday (April 4) as my year, so by my reckoning I still have three months left. 🙂

This is the year I turned 40. That number seems impossible. I can remember being a child. My mother had this framed saying that she had cross-stiched which read: “Life begins at 40.” I can actually remember thinking, “Forty is ancient. How could anybody live to be that old?” Only now, I don’t feel ancient. I feel like life is just beginning. I wanted 40 to be memorable, and it has certainly been that. In many ways this has been one of the best years of my life. I’m excited for 2016, but I wonder how it could ever top 2015…

Still, the best day is the next day and I am so looking forward to what’s coming. But for right now, I have to stop and give a word of thanks for all the ways I was blessed this year.

A view of the Northern Lights over Lake McDonald at 11:56 p.m. on Thursday, April 9, in Glacier National Park. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

A view of the Northern Lights over Lake McDonald at 11:56 p.m. on Thursday, April 9, in Glacier National Park. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

My biggest news was this: For my sixth anniversary here in Montana I created a video retrospective of some of my favorite shots from my time here. I combined this with a song I fell in love with by Mike Murray called Bury Me in Montana (if you’re interested you can find it on iTunes on his album Tumbleweed). As of today the video has been seen 130,000 times.

If you want to see it, it’s at the top of my Brenda Ahearn Photography page on facebook. https://www.facebook.com/BrendaAhearnPhotography/

The other major milestone for me this year was having on of my photos published in Time magazine. It’s a bit odd, the way things hit me. I’ve been working full time for a newspaper since 2002. And I’ve been seeing my work get printed since 1996. One would think that after so much time, I would be pretty well immune to the thrill of seeing my work in print. Not so. I still get a kick out of it. I love it when I get the front page of the paper I work for. Or even one of the inside pages. All I really care about is that the printing looks good and thanks to our press guys most of the time, the prints look very good. I love it when I find the AP has picked up one of my photos and it went out nationwide or even worldwide. I’ve had photos show up in some pretty major papers. My favorite was five years ago when I got my first photo in USA Today. Ironically USA Today isn’t delivered in Montana. Go figure. Still, it was a thrill. And this this year… Wow. It started with an email: would I be interested in having one of my photos considered for publication in Time magazine. Hell YES!!!! Except, of course, I wrote something far more professional in response. And come to find out they loved the photo and wanted it. Were even willing to pay the Inter Lake fee to get it. After all, I shot the photo while on assignment for the DIL so I don’t own the rights to it. They lady at Time graciously sent me 5 copies of the magazine. It’s the October issue with Pope Frances on the front. I am so honored.

Copies of the magazine sent to me courtesy of Time, as well as the photo they published with a story on the popularity of adventure racing.

Copies of the magazine sent to me courtesy of Time, as well as the photo they published with a story on the popularity of adventure racing.

This year I photographed 14 families, 2 surprise engagements in Glacier, and 9 weddings. I got to see the Pacific ocean for the first time in too many years and I got to be a part of two of the best swing dance workshops ever followed by a trek to Seattle and some photos of the ones I love out there.

This was also one of the most epic years I’ve had medically. Three hospitalizations. I broke my left arm in April. I had surgery in June. And after photographing fire season in September I ended up in the ER with the most dangerous asthma attack of my life. But I survived. And as I look back at the fear and pain they only make grateful for this incredible life.

Now…how to organize all this? I’ve narrowed it down to my top 100 photos. And that was painful to do. But it’s still too much. So I am going to post these over the next three days. First off will be all my newspaper work. This includes my Scenics from Montana because frankly, our readers love them, and I’m lucky enough to work at a newspaper that let’s me put these kinds of pretty pictures in the paper. Then photos from the music and entertainment world. And finally, weddings and family stuff.

To everyone who shared this year with me, the good and the bad, thank you. I am so sincerely grateful.
Much love,
Bren

A large snow covered gate makes a frame for a winter scenic near Echo Lake on Thursday morning, January 8. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Yellow Bay at Flathead Lake

Structure Fire in Evergreen

Glacier National Park

A singing Valentine's from Classic Touch

These two images started with a text from a Deputy that read: Truck in water in Bigfork. I never mind getting woken up at 2 a.m. when I get photos like this out of it.

These two images started with a text from a Deputy that read: Truck in water in Bigfork. I never mind getting woken up at 2 a.m. when I get photos like this out of it.

 

One year anniversary for ImagineIF Library

Eric Michael Krop, one of my favorite local talents.

Eric Michael Krop, one of my favorite local talents.

 

Playing in Puddles

A view of the Northern Lights over Lake McDonald at 11:56 p.m. on Thursday, April 9, in Glacier National Park.

A view of the Northern Lights over Lake McDonald at 11:56 p.m. on Thursday, April 9, in Glacier National Park.

 

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John Dunnigan at the Great Northern Bar in Whitefish, on Thursday, May 14. In the middle of a portrait session Dunnigan looked up, saw a friend and had to wave.

John Dunnigan at the Great Northern Bar in Whitefish, on Thursday, May 14. In the middle of a portrait session Dunnigan looked up, saw a friend and had to wave.

Of my photos of John Dunnigan this was my favorite. But for those who know his personality, the first image is more authentically him.

Of my photos of John Dunnigan this was my favorite. But for those who know his personality, the first image is more authentically him.

 

Structure fire in Columbia Falls. May 2015.

Structure fire in Columbia Falls. May 2015.

 

Memorial Day 2015

A view of Kalispell at sunset from the forth story tower of the Kalispell Fire Department downtown station on Wednesday, May 27.

A view of Kalispell at sunset from the forth story tower of the Kalispell Fire Department downtown station on Wednesday, May 27.

 

Snow in June in Glacier National Park. Oh how I love life in Montana.

Snow in June in Glacier National Park. Oh how I love life in Montana.

 

"Gramma" Jean Livesay, 86, gets a hug from her neighbor James Francis on Friday morning, June 12, in Kalispell. Jean has been waving to students from the window of her Wyoming Street home for two years. For the last week of school she made a sign for her front yard and for Friday, the last day of school, she moved from her window to her front yard to wave at students and parents as they pass by.

“Gramma” Jean Livesay, 86, gets a hug from her neighbor James Francis on Friday morning, June 12, in Kalispell. Jean has been waving to students from the window of her Wyoming Street home for two years. For the last week of school she made a sign for her front yard and for Friday, the last day of school, she moved from her window to her front yard to wave at students and parents as they pass by.

 

I know photographically this photo isn't much. But the story was fantastic. I mean really, how often does one hear the words "airborne" and "minivan" together? The van went off the road, went airborne, and landed on top of the red car. It was funny but that's mainly because no one was seriously hurt.

I know photographically this photo isn’t much. But the story was fantastic. I mean really, how often does one hear the words “airborne” and “minivan” together? The van went off the road, went airborne, and landed on top of the red car. It was funny but that’s mainly because no one was seriously hurt.

 

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A view of the main runway at Glacier Park International Airport. I am amazed sometimes at all the places my work takes me to...places that most people never get to see.

A view of the main runway at Glacier Park International Airport. I am amazed sometimes at all the places my work takes me to…places that most people never get to see.

 

Daniel Kirk's ordination as the new priest for Saint Herman’s.

Daniel Kirk’s ordination as the new priest for Saint Herman’s. I wrote the story for the paper on this one as well as doing the photos. To see more of it go to: https://brendaahearn.wordpress.com/2015/08/14/too-close-to-the-story/

 

A view of the Reynolds Creek Fire near East Glacier on Wednesday, July 22.

A view of the Reynolds Creek Fire near East Glacier on Wednesday, July 22.

 

Steampunk family in downtown Kalispell.

Steampunk family in downtown Kalispell.

 

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The Evergreen fire. August 2015.

The Evergreen fire. August 2015.

 

Smoke from the Thompson Fire in Glacier National Park pours into the sky in this view from Lost Creek Road and Farm-to-Market Road in West Valley. This photo got picked up by the Associated Press and ended up in USA Today. Ironically, this photo was used nationally to illustrate the wildfires in California.

Smoke from the Thompson Fire in Glacier National Park pours into the sky in this view from Lost Creek Road and Farm-to-Market Road in West Valley.
This photo got picked up by the Associated Press and ended up in USA Today. Ironically, this photo was used nationally to illustrate the wildfires in California.

 

Marston Fire

I'm flying in a Blackhawk photographing this Blackhawk. Life is so awesome.

I’m flying in a Blackhawk photographing this Blackhawk. Life is so awesome.

 

This was my first photo back on the job after being in the ER for the most severe asthma attack of my life. Clean blue skies never meant so much to me before.

This was my first photo back on the job after being in the ER for the most severe asthma attack of my life. Clean blue skies never meant so much to me before.

 

One of the most devastating wrecks I have ever seen: The driver of a Budweiser truck takes a moment off to the side of a collision with a Ford f250 truck on September 9, at the intersection of U.S. 93 and Farm-to-Market Road north of Whitefish.

One of the most devastating wrecks I have ever seen: The driver of a Budweiser truck takes a moment off to the side of a collision with a Ford f250 truck on September 9, at the intersection of U.S. 93 and Farm-to-Market Road north of Whitefish.

 

Benghazi Memorial 9/11 ceremony in Bigfork Montana. This was the second year for the event and this year featured a former member of the CIA and founder of the organization DeliverFund, which is a group of former special forces operators now dedicated to rescuing victims of sex trafficking.

Benghazi Memorial 9/11 ceremony in Bigfork Montana. This was the second year for the event and this year featured a former member of the CIA and founder of the organization DeliverFund, which is a group of former special forces operators now dedicated to rescuing victims of sex trafficking. I have written a blog about these guys and their work: https://brendaahearn.wordpress.com/2015/12/03/do-something-good-in-the-world/

 

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Serene Scene along the Flathead River

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Montana Life: Scarecrow Sue

Fall Feature

A colorful sunrise lights up the sky from Fairmont and Kinshella Road east of Kalispell on Thursday morning, October 22. I posted both of these photos to the Daily Inter Lake Facebook page and we let the readers pick which one would run in the paper. The top photo was the hands-down winner.

A colorful sunrise lights up the sky from Fairmont and Kinshella Road east of Kalispell on Thursday morning, October 22.
I posted both of these photos to the Daily Inter Lake Facebook page and we let the readers pick which one would run in the paper. The top photo was the hands-down winner.

 

Fire in Evergreen

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Last year I wrote a story about USMC Captain Wayne Bolton. This year for Christmas Wayne ended up recovering from triple-bypass surgery. But he wasn't alone for the holidays. The Marines turned out to Celebrate Christmas with him. Semper Fi!

Last year I wrote a story about USMC Captain Wayne Bolton. This year for Christmas Wayne ended up recovering from triple-bypass surgery. But he wasn’t alone for the holidays. The Marines turned out to Celebrate Christmas with him. Semper Fi!    Here is a link to the story of Wayne, one of the survivors of the Battle of the Chosin Reservoir, Korea: https://brendaahearn.wordpress.com/2014/11/27/remembering-chosin/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do something good in the world…

Here you will find details on your chance to get $100 dollars off family photo sessions  and the rest of the money goes directly to saving a life. (Please note: there are only 14 photo sessions available and you must contact me to confirm you are one of the 14. Details below…)

df_blog_vandykeIn 2005 my beloved friends, Jon and Michelle Duncan, gave me a wonderful Christmas present: a copy of The Story of the Other Wise Man by Henry Van Dyke. I read it at least once a year. If I only read it once, it’s always around this time. I have loaned this book out on occasion, but I always experience a certain about of trepidation about doing this. I love the story and want to share it, to bless other lives the way mine has been blessed. But I worry that someone won’t understand how precious this battered old book is to me and won’t be careful…

This is one of my favorite stories. It’s the shortest book I own, but I would put it in my top ten of all time, right up there with Man’s Search for Meaning and The Little Prince. There is just something so eloquent about this story…something that stirs the soul and ends with such power and beauty that it is truly magical. And the best part is, it’s so old, and so forgotten that you can get it for free on Amazon. http://www.amazon.com/Story-Other-Wise-Man-ebook/dp/B0084C98FO/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1449079809&sr=8-2

 When Jon gave me the book he told me, don’t judge the first pages. He cautioned that it takes a little time to get into the story. I’m glad he warned me because without that, I might not have given the book the chance it deserves.

By now you are probably wondering what the heck does this have to do with family photo sessions and discounts. Patience, I promise I’ll explain.

Last night I read my book again. The pages are old and soft and have that yellowish-brown tinge that comes with age. The first time I read the book, I sort of slogged through the beginning. But now, I love every word so much that when I read this book I read it cover to cover. Including the introduction (which is not part of the amazon version).

The Story of the Other Wise Man is a bit of fiction based on the Biblical Magi who travel from the East to find Jesus in Bethlehem. In Van Dyke’s story there was to be a fourth member of that party. But circumstances arise and he is forced to miss departing with his friends and follows later on his own. The story follows the life of Artaban as he searches endlessly for the King. Near the end he faces his final challenge, he can continue his quest or he can save a young girl.

df_blog1I’ve read this over and over. But this year, when I got to the scene where the girl cries out and begs him to save her “for the sake of the God of purity” I couldn’t help but think of DeliverFund.

DeliverFund is a group of former American Special Forces warriors who are taking their incredible knowledge and skill set and applying it to battling sex trafficking.

Here’s their mission statement:
“DeliverFund disrupts global human trafficking markets by combining uniquely qualified personnel with the best technologies, and then leveraging them in new ways to reach and rescue victims of human trafficking.”
Can you imagine this? It’s amazing. We’re talking about the most elite of the American military and intelligence communities, Navy SEALs, CIA, Army Rangers, Delta Force…. These are people who spent years attaining the highest levels of physical preparedness and military training. People who know all about leadership and command and tactics and special operations and counterterrorism. What does one do with that sort of education once their time in the military is over? Well, for these guys the answer is to take what they know, and who they know, and combine their resources and do surveilance and tracking and gathering evidence to give to law enforcement officers to put those who traffic in the selling of women and girls and boys and anyone they can sell for any price, to put them in jail. DeliverFund is out there working to stop the source of it. Not just to rescue a victim and take them out of that hell (though they do that) but to get the pimps and pushers and the genuinely evil off the streets and behind bars.

The girl in the story, when she begs for her life, she says, “Save me from worse than death.”

Worse than death. That is what prostitution is. Every time I think about this, I find myself thinking, I wish I could help. But really, what can I do? I’m one person, and I’m not rich, and I am certainly not capable of helping with the work they do. But I want to help. So…here’s how you can get a great discount on a family photo session and help out with a genuinely worthy cause. I normally do family photos for $250. This is usually around 30 photos. You get a dvd with the images and the right to print them as you see fit. If you will donate $150 to DeliverFund.org  I will do a family photo session for you for free. (There are important restrictions to this! See below.) When you donate through their website you’ll get an electronic receipt. Print that out and give show it to me you’ll get to pick a date and get some new family photos. DeliverFund is a 501C3 so donations are tax deductible. I’m not interested in making any money on these. All of the money will go directly to the charity. And here’s the best part, I talked to one of the founders. A pimp usually runs five girls. The cost to stop one of these monsters is about $10,000. That’s $2000 per victim. I am going to do 14 of these photo shoots. That will raise $2100. That’s one life that is going to be saved. One life! One victim. One person who will no longer live in a hell that is worse than death.

Restrictions! I am only going to do fourteen of these so, contact me asap if you want one. If you donate and fail to contact me to confirm that you are one of the 14, this offer is invalid. You can send me a text at 406.471.7462. The sessions have to be paid for at the time of purchase. Normally, I don’t ask to be paid beyond the deposit until the time of the photo shoot, but this is for DeliverFund and I want it to get it to them by the end of the year. The photo sessions must be scheduled for no later than May 31, 2016, but you don’t have to pick your date right now. Pay for the session and we can figure out the dates later. Beyond May gets into wedding season for me and after May, I’m pretty well booked until the end of autumn. That’s why we have the May 31 deadline. A family photo session is one family – two generations. Maximum number of people = 6. Exceptions can be made, but need to be discussed prior to booking. Larger family groups count as a reunion and are not eligible.

Final note: here a link to a short video about DeliverFund and the work they are doing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YujkCiDl17k&feature=player_embedded
If you want to win excessive amounts of loyalty and admiration from me, make the donation out for more than $150. This is an organization that deserves it. If I could do more, I would….

Thank you all in advance for your consideration. Merry Christmas.

P.S. before anyone comments about consenting adults and what they choose to do, watch the video and listen to the girl. Pretty Woman isn’t reality. It isn’t the prostitute who is in charge.

voucher

Too Close to the Story

Bishop Maxim blesses the new temple in a service at Saint Herman Orthodox Church on Sunday, July 19, in Kalispell. More than 100 clergy, members and guests were at the historic service where the Rev. Daniel Kirk was ordained to be the priest for Saint HermanÕs and became the first Orthodox priest to be ordained the in the state of Montana.  (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Bishop Maxim blesses the new temple in a service at Saint Herman Orthodox Church on Sunday, July 19, in Kalispell. More than 100 clergy, members and guests were at the historic service where the Rev. Daniel Kirk was ordained to be the priest for Saint HermanÕs and became the first Orthodox priest to be ordained the in the state of Montana.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

I love my work. A few weeks ago I got to attend the first Orthodox ordination in the state of Montana. If you are not familiar with Orthodoxy, it is complex, ornate, exquisite, formal. It’s beautiful. It makes the traditionalist in me very happy, even if does run a bit on the long side.

Mostly my work is just images. I have to gather enough information to write up the photo captions, but the reporting of stories, isn’t my job. And I like it this way. But sometimes, it just seems to make sense that I write the story as well as photograph it. This ordination became one of these cases. It was a two hour ceremony on a Sunday (both photographers at our newspaper have Sundays off and as many reporters as can have off, take the day, so we have a bit of a skeleton crew on Sundays. I had to go because I wanted to photograph it. But reporters can do a lot of their job over the phone or after the fact. Photographers must be there.

When I got back to the office and started going through all the images, I realized there was so much information, not just visually, but with all the traditions, the decorations, the cultures. I felt as though I had to tell this, because I was the only member of the Inter Lake who saw it. I made it my project, my responsibility.

And…I got too close to the story.

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

My editor gave me an 800 word limit. This is a lot. The last story I did, I was granted 300 words. Yikes. How do you explain the entire Orthodox experience in 800 words? It can’t be done. At least, that is what I convinced myself of.

When you get too close to the story, you loose perspective. It’s like looking at one of those painting that uses the pointillism technique. From a distance you get the whole picture, up close, it’s all just a bunch of chaos and individual specs. I got too close. I got so wrapped up in the details that I didn’t actually find the story until the very end. My word count, just under 2,600. Five pages. WAY too long to print in a newspaper.

So, not one, but two editors worked their magic and created a much shorter version of this story. As soon as I have the link I’ll share it here:

But even though it’s too long and I am too close, there is something about the longer version that I still like. I’m still proud of this. Still glad I got to explore both the written and visual side of this experience. Since this version will never be printed, I figured it is just about perfect for a blog.

I hope you enjoy it. And forgive me…it’s very long.

A detail of one of the icons in the newly constructed iconostasis. This large wooden screen was built by Joshua Hicks of Polson and incorporates some distinctively American features. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

A detail of one of the icons in the newly constructed iconostasis. This large wooden screen was built by Joshua Hicks of Polson and incorporates some distinctively American features.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Orthodox Ordination
Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake

Daniel Kirk, 29,is a seventh-generation Montanan, raised on a ranch near Cardwell, Montana and homeschooled. He is also the first Eastern Orthodox priest to be ordained in the state of Montana.

Kirk got his start with Holy Trinity Orthodox Church in Butte.

“Holy Trinity is an old parish, 113 years old. When I considered the priesthood I never thought about being a first on any level,” Kirk said. “Priests have come and served in Montana, but none of them have been ordained here. For me, this is a unique blessing.”

“When I began to feel I might have a call to the priesthood there was a natural draw for me to return home and serve here,” Kirk said. “In Orthodoxy I felt I had found my spiritual home and I wanted to bring that to Montana, but honestly I never thought it would happen. In the old world it is common that one of your neighbors would receive the call and become the local pastor. In American, we don’t seem to have that because we are such a transient society. Added to that, there is the size of the diocese. Our diocese, which has its cathedral in Los Angeles covers the state of Alaska, from the northern border of the continental United States down to the southern border of Mexico and from Colorado all the way over to Hawaii, is geographically one of the largest in the world, and yet there are only 40 parishes. So you go where there is a need, and for Anne and I, there was a need here.”

Bishop Maxim of the Serbian Orthodox diocese of Western America is greeting by the crowd gathered outside Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19, for the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk, the first priest to serve at Saint Herman and the first Orthodox priest to be ordained in the state of Montana. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Bishop Maxim of the Serbian Orthodox diocese of Western America is greeting by the crowd gathered outside Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19, for the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk, the first priest to serve at Saint Herman and the first Orthodox priest to be ordained in the state of Montana.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

In the beginning

Tikhon Hanlon, a founding member of Kalispell’s parish, moved to Kalispell in 2010.

According to Hanlon, it all began with two families. The Cook family in Eureka had been in touch with Father Russell in Butte. Hanlon said he also got in touch with Russell, asking if there were any Orthodox parishes in the area.

There were not, and so a group of five people began gathering weekly for reader services. In Eastern Orthodox tradition, a reader service is conducted when no priest is available. It is an abbreviated version of Sunday service that consists of liturgical reading, reading of the Psalms, and choir and worship songs.

In the summer of 2011, Father Russell traveled to Kalispell to lead four nights of introduction to Orthodoxy classes in the basement of Colter Coffee. Attendance varied, but following the class the number of faithful gathering weekly grew to 7 or 8, and it has continued to grow slowly but steadily since. The parish currently has 60-65 regular members.

“We didn’t have the Eucharist, the part of a Christian ceremony commemorating the Last Supper; we really didn’t know what we were doing,” Hanlon said.

The process of becoming an officially recognized Eastern Orthodox parish is complex. The founding members didn’t select a name until they reached the first stage in the life of a church, which is to become an officially recognized satellite church, in this case, a satellite of Butte’s Holy Trinity.

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

“When a parish is founded in the Orthodox Church it requires the effort of everyone; the entire diocese is involved,” Kirk said. “One diocese is considered a ‘local church.’ So when we say this has involved the whole local church, that means the Bishop, the clergy, and all the faithful praying and contributing. It takes a whole diocese for one new parish to begin.”

A satellite parish isn’t on the books of the diocese. Rather it is acknowledged as dependent on another church. When the Kalispell group reached this stage, it took on the name Saint Herman Orthodox Church.

According to Hanlon, the founders here always had an affinity for St. Herman of Alaska. He is called one of the “Enlighteners of America.” St. Herman came from Russia in the early 19th century. He and a group of Russian Orthodox monks traveled from Finland across Russia and the Bering Strait to Alaska, which was at the time a colony of imperial Russia. St. Herman is seen as an apostle to the American people. As a result of his missionary work, there are even today a large number of Native Americans in Alaska who practice Orthodoxy.

“In this parish we are primarily converts and we feel his vision and intercession for us,” Kirk said.

The Re. Daniel Kirk before receiving his ordination and vestments on Sunday, July 19, at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

The Re. Daniel Kirk before receiving his ordination and vestments on Sunday, July 19, at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Kirk’s connection to the St. Herman community began in the summer of 2011. He was attending seminary at Saint Tikhon’s Orthodox Theological Seminary in South Canaan, Pennsylvania and returning to serve in Montana during the summers. As he progressed through training, he became connected with St. Herman through Holy Trinity.

In 2014, Bishop Maxim traveled to Butte to celebrate the Pentecost feast in May. A group of delegates from St. Herman’s traveled to Butte at the same time to present a letter of petition to formally establish St. Herman as a mission parish within the diocese.

A mission parish is the intermediate stage in the life of a church, when the diocese recognizes the church as a fledgling parish. The group is given time and support to procure a building and begin full services. St. Herman was approved that day.

A mission parish gets seven years to procure a building, gather finances to afford the salary for a priest, and then secure a full-time priest. St. Herman accomplished all these steps in one year.

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

“It’s so surprising,” Hanlon said. “From the beginning it’s all been a surprise that people come to our home, would show up on a regular basis, that we would grow the way we have. I always believed it would take a decade to get a parish and a priest here in Kalispell.”

“That’s common,” Kirk agreed. “It can take a lot of time to get used to the name and concept, to have a group of believers grow into a parish in a place as diverse as this. The way things have progressed so quickly here is rare.”

In 2014, Kirk was ordained as a deacon and assigned to Holy Trinity. As an assistant to Father Russell he was able to come to Kalispell and get to know the parish from its start as a satellite parish.

“I felt drawn here,” Kirk said. “I grew to love and appreciate the dedicated people here.”

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

During Lent of this year, St. Herman saw its biggest growth spurt. A representative of Bishop Maxim visited St. Herman’s. Father Predrag, a diocesan dean, came just before “Pascha,” the feast of the resurrection of the Lord, celebrated on April 12 according to the Orthodox calendar. Father Predrag reported back that St. Herman was ready to take the next step and have a priest of its own. At the same time, he informed the bishop of the special relationship that had developed between the Kirk family and the people of St. Herman.

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

“We had been hoping it would work out exactly like this,” Tikhon said. “You don’t want to presume. You don’t want to invest too much into what you are hoping will happen because you don’t want to be disappointed.”

Yet all admit that while they were hoping and praying for God to move and work his plan according to His will, it seemed impossible that Kirk’s path to becoming a priest and St. Herman’s path to becoming a parish could ever be brought into perfect alignment.

“That is part of the unique blessing of all this,” Kirk said. “We couldn’t do this. We couldn’t make this happen. Only God could have brought things together in such a way. There are so many ways things can go wrong. We felt God’s providence and St. Herman’s intercession for countless details that needed to fall precisely into place.”

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Within days of receiving Father Predrag’s report, Bishop Maxim approved his recommendation. St. Herman’s congregation was ecstatic. And then the reality of the time crunch set in; Bishop Maxim gave them until mid-July to have everything in order for Kirk’s ordination and for the blessing of the new temple.

Work began in May. The church owned a building that was being rented by another church, but the Orthodox style is so specific that the entire building had to be gutted, renovated and redone. Stadium-style seating that was bolted to the floor and a baptismal fount had to be completely removed. New floors, carpets, paint, and a ceiling were all needed. The main feature is a new iconostasis.

A photograph from behind the iconostasis by acolyte of the church Walter Keathley. Keathley, who is not a member of clergy, received a special blessing to go behind the iconostasis and capture this photograph. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

A photograph from behind the iconostasis by acolyte of the church Walter Keathley. Keathley, who is not a member of clergy, received a special blessing to go behind the iconostasis and capture this photograph.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

St. Herman’s iconostasis dominates the interior of the temple. The iconostasis is a wooden screen featuring multiple icons, separating where the congregation stands from the alter. Only priests and deacons or those who have been given a special blessing may pass through the screen.

Joshua Hicks, of Polson, built the iconostasis at St. Herman. Hicks converted to the Orthodox Christian faith last year. He also built the iconostasis for St. Anthony Orthodox Church in Bozeman.

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Having Hicks build this for St. Herman is yet another of the unique blessings Father Daniel sees in the story of this church.

“An iconostasis is so unfamiliar in this country. Often churches will have no choice but to order them from overseas,” Kirk said.

Having a local craftsman do the work gave the parish the opportunity to incorporate some American elements into their screen, like a carved pineapple, a symbol of hospitality and welcome.

This American touch is particularly significant to Kirk.

“As Orthodoxy expanded and evangelized it became part of the local communities and cultures,” Kirk said. “The parish works to engage the local community, to reach out and transform. Yet as it reaches out, it is also transformed by the specific people who convert.”

The center of the Eastern Orthodox Christian Church is still located in Istanbul, but there are 14 independent Orthodox churches — including Serbian, like St. Herman — Russian, Greek and others, in the United States.

“Istanbul is considered the first among equals,” Kirk said. “What we hope to see, as the church in America grows, is the same kind of transformation in these American parishes that was seen in the past. What we hope to have someday is an American Orthodox.”

“Today it is not uncommon for an Orthodox priest in the United States to be asked if he is Muslim. Often when a priest speaks of being Orthodox, the first question is to inquire if he is an Orthodox Jew,” Kirk said. “Our hope is that Orthodox Christianity will become a serious contributor to the shape of American culture, and to be recognizable as fundamentally connected to America in terms of its symbols, customs and appearance.”

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Renovations to St. Herman were complete on July 17. Bishop Maxim arrived on July 18 and Father Daniel Kirk was ordained in a Sunday morning service on July 19.

On July 18, Bishop Maxim presided over a vespers service, followed by a meet and greet with the congregation over local craft beers from the Flathead Lake Brewing Company. Bishop Maxim also gifted St. Herman with an 800-year-old relic. A relic can be the earthly remains of a saint, such as bones, or even the clothing or vestments. Bishop Maxim gave St. Herman a relic of a great Serbian monastic saint, St. Peter of Korisha.

“In the church, both time and space are mingled together in the body of Christ to become united,” Kirk explained. “This gift is a manifestation of the conviction that Christ is in the 800-year-old relic, and Christ is in the modern church in America. We are one.”

On July 19, St. Herman Orthodox Church celebrated its first divine liturgy, which is another name for a regular service requiring a priest.

A censor disperses incense into the air during a service at Saint Herman Orthodox Church on Sunday, July 19, in Kalispell. "Incense is a physical offering. It represents the prayers of all the faithful," said the Rev. Daniel Kirk. "It comes from Psalm 141: 'Let my prayer be set forth before thee as incense.'" (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

A censor disperses incense into the air during a service at Saint Herman Orthodox Church on Sunday, July 19, in Kalispell. “Incense is a physical offering. It represents the prayers of all the faithful,” said the Rev. Daniel Kirk. “It comes from Psalm 141: ‘Let my prayer be set forth before thee as incense.'”
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

“The service was beautiful — stunning,” Hanlon said. “Having that many clergy is always an incredible sight because of their vestments and the way they move and interact with one another.”

“Overwhelming is the best word for it. It felt unreal to have the Bishop visiting, to have that many people attending in our new beautiful space. It was invigorating. I felt like we were a thriving church.”

That day, in addition to the service, worship, blessing and consecration of the temple, the clergy and parishioners gathered for the ordination of Father Daniel.

“Our little community has stuck together really nicely all this way, and that has been difficult without a priest,” Hanlon said. “We needed this. We were moving forward, growing, but being without a priest was becoming harder and harder. So it was deeply satisfying to see our ‘stick-to-it-iveness’ pay off so magnificently.”

“It isn’t very often you get everything that you almost didn’t dare to hope for.”

The Rev. Daniel Kirk looks out over the parish during the blessing of the temple on Sunday, July 19, at Saint Herman Orthodox Church. Kirk was ordained later that day. "I was also filled with such joy at the sight of each one of these faces that I have come to know and love," recalls Kirk. "It felt like a little piece of Heaven." (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

The Rev. Daniel Kirk looks out over the parish during the blessing of the temple on Sunday, July 19, at Saint Herman Orthodox Church. Kirk was ordained later that day. “I was also filled with such joy at the sight of each one of these faces that I have come to know and love,” recalls Kirk. “It felt like a little piece of Heaven.”
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

For Father Daniel, the beauty of the day came with both a deep sense of blessing and satisfaction, but also with the weight of responsibility.

“The flow of events could not have worked better in so many ways. When the bishop comes there is always a heightened level of intensity. And with so many visiting clergy members, that added to the day as well. We had visiting Greek, Ukranian, Serbian Orthodox with us and yet there was so much grace present that we really did kind of breathe together. What I mean is there was no stumbling over the individual traditions, we all came together in such unity.”

“When I looked out over the service, seeing the faithful gathered together, I felt fear and overwhelming love,” Kirk added. “The enormity of my responsibility all came rushing in. These people have waited so long, worked so hard to build this parish, to reach this point. And now I am here to serve them.”

He pauses for a moment looking for the words. “I was also filled with such joy at the sight of each one of these faces that I have come to know and love. It felt like a little piece of Heaven.”

The Rev. Daniel Kirk receives his vestments, the robe worn by clergy, on Sunday, July 19. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

The Rev. Daniel Kirk receives his vestments, the robe worn by clergy, on Sunday, July 19.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

What lies ahead

Officially the next step will come when St. Herman is able to give funding and support back to the diocese. At that point they will be elevated to full parish status. But that is the far distant aspiration.

“Our biggest goal is to become a member of this community in Kalispell,” Kirk said. “To open the doors to anyone who is hungry and seeking after Christ. It’s a big responsibility for all of us. It means taking our faith seriously in every aspect of our lives.”

All services at St. Herman are open to the public. There are Great Vespers at 6 p.m. on Saturday evenings, which include a time of prayer and worship music. Sunday morning service begins at 10 a.m. and is generally about two hours long. The church is also holding Wednesday evening vespers at 6:30 p.m., followed by a weekly class on Orthodoxy.

For more information, visit www.sainthermanoc.org.

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Bishop Maxim, head of theÊSerbian Orthodox diocese of Western America, one of the geographically largest diocese in America, takes part in the blessing of the new temple of Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19.

Bishop Maxim, head of theÊSerbian Orthodox diocese of Western America, one of the geographically largest diocese in America, takes part in the blessing of the new temple of Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19.

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Detail of service at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell, on Sunday, July 19. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Detail of service at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell, on Sunday, July 19.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

In the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk the bishop ordains by the 'laying on of hands' a practice from the New Testament. In this a priest is set apart for the celebration of the mysteries of the church. Only an ordained priest can consecrate the elements used in communion. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

In the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk the bishop ordains by the ‘laying on of hands’ a practice from the New Testament. In this a priest is set apart for the celebration of the mysteries of the church. Only an ordained priest can consecrate the elements used in communion.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

The Rev. Daniel Kirk take part in offering communion and blessings for the members of Saint Herman Orthodox Church on Sunday, July 19, in Kalispell. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

The Rev. Daniel Kirk take part in offering communion and blessings for the members of Saint Herman Orthodox Church on Sunday, July 19, in Kalispell.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

The Charm Campaign

View from atop the Evergreen Fire and Rescue ladder truck of a fire on Mountain View Drive in Evergreen on Wednesday, August 5. The helicopter is from the Department of Natural Resources and Conservation. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake) (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

View from atop the Evergreen Fire and Rescue ladder truck of a fire on Mountain View Drive in Evergreen on Wednesday, August 5. The helicopter is from the Department of Natural Resources and Conservation. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

It doesn’t take spending a whole lot of time with me to realize that I consider those who serve in the military, in law enforcement, or as firefighters, heroes. They are the good guys (and girls) and they have my respect and admiration. In a way, they all remind me of my greatest hero, my father, Sgt. Michael James Ahearn, USMC.

In my career as a newspaper photographer I have been both blessed and cursed in my dealings with these groups. The blessing is that I get to work with them, get to know them, get to do my small part to show them in their daily lives serving their communities and not getting as much credit as I wish they did. As far as them getting credit and recognition, I get to help with that and I love it.

A Creston firefighter battles the blaze at a structure fire/grassland fire on Mountain View Drive in Evergreen on Wednesday, August 5. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

A Creston firefighter battles the blaze at a structure fire/grassland fire on Mountain View Drive in Evergreen on Wednesday, August 5.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

The curse is, military, cops and firefighters tend to have an aversion to members of the media. I don’t blame them for this. Most of them have either personally had a bad experience with biased, unethical journalists. If they haven’t lived through it for themselves, they have certainly been warned by their brothers that media people are not to be trusted. Again, I don’t blame them for this attitude, the sad fact is journalism and ethics don’t walk hand-in-hand so much these days.
Fire in Evergreen
In the six years I have lived in Montana I have slowly but surely started making friends and allies amongst the local first responders. I don’t have a lot of active duty military connections yet, so for me, cops are the hardest. For a couple of years now I’ve been doing photos and ride alongs with members of the Flathead County Sheriff’s Office. I will never forget how joyful I felt when the team leader for the SWAT Team told me that every member of the team was on board for me doing photos of them. They decided to trust me. And I’m honored. And, just a few weeks ago a very stern (and a little scary) Montana Highway Patrol Trooper told me he appreciated me, the work I do, and the way I do my work. He made my day.
Fire in Evergreen
My editor Scott refers to my efforts to improve relations with these groups as the “charm campaign.” The newspaper likes it because over time I have slowly started to win over some of the locals. It takes ages, but it’s so worth it.

A DNRC helicopter flies through smoke to drop water on the scene of a massive fire on Mountain View Drive in Evergreen on Wednesday, August 5. Evergreen Fire and Rescue were joined by the Kalispell and Creston fire departments, the Flathead County Sheriff's Office, forest firefighters and other first responders.  (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

A DNRC helicopter flies through smoke to drop water on the scene of a massive fire on Mountain View Drive in Evergreen on Wednesday, August 5. Evergreen Fire and Rescue were joined by the Kalispell and Creston fire departments, the Flathead County Sheriff’s Office, forest firefighters and other first responders.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

As a journalist its worth every effort because I get better photos and better access. When they see me, they know who I am, they know I’m not going to get in the way or stir up trouble and so they don’t have to question me. On the days when I am really lucky I will sometimes even get tips and texts letting me know what’s going on. I recently spent a full day and four nights riding with the Kalispell Fire Department documenting a day in the life…best part? Text messages when there is a fire I should get to. Love that!

High winds contributed to the structure fire/ grassland fire on Mountain View Drive in Evergreen on Wednesday, August 5. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

High winds contributed to the structure fire/ grassland fire on Mountain View Drive in Evergreen on Wednesday, August 5.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Firefighters are tricky… There are rules that make photographing them difficult. If a firefighter gets his name and photo in the paper, he or she will have to buy ice cream or pizza or tacos or whatever for the whole shift. I have seen firefighters notice me taking pictures and deliberately turn and walk the other way. Do you know how frustrating that is!!! I could strangle them for this! But even the ones who don’t want to be photographed, they’ll go out of their way to help get me the access I need for photos and to keep me safe while I’m taking pictures. Sometimes they say no when I ask. In fact, that happens quite a lot. But I ask for a lot. And they never seem to resent me asking the questions. Sometimes though, they say yes, and then I get photos like these. This fire was only 6 acres, contained due to the combined efforts of at least 4 fire departments. And because I know these people, they let me in, they let me get close, they trust me and they allow me to do my job.

Fire in EvergreenBut there are other results of this so-called “campaign,” ones that have nothing to do with the newspaper. Results that are frankly far more important to me than photos. My father died when I was 25 years old. He got to see the start of my photography career, but only a little. I so desperately wish he could have seen who I grew up to be. When I think of my dad, the man he was, the Marine that he was, I know that if he was alive today he would see my work with these heroes and he would be proud of me.

My parents are the measuring stick against which I evaluate the trajectory and the fruits of my life. They are always with me, but they are silent. When one of the cops or firefighters or the military people that I know decides to trust me, even a little, I can almost hear my father’s voice. I can see his smile and hear him say “Good job.”

Fire in Evergreen

Evergreen Fire and Rescue Chief Williams looks out over the structure fire/grassland fire that filled the skies over Evergreen with smoke on Tuesday, August 4. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Evergreen Fire and Rescue Chief Williams looks out over the structure fire/grassland fire that filled the skies over Evergreen with smoke on Tuesday, August 5. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

James Boyce of Evergreen Fire and Rescue. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

James Boyce of Evergreen Fire and Rescue. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Kyle Gully of the Kalispell Fire Department. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Kyle Gully of the Kalispell Fire Department. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

A firefighter battles a fire in an outbuilding south of the main structure fire on Wednesday, August 5, on Mountain View Drive in Evergreen. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

A firefighter battles a fire in an outbuilding south of the main structure fire on Wednesday, August 5, on Mountain View Drive in Evergreen.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Smoke billows from a massive fire on Mountain View Drive in Evergreen on Wednesday, August 5. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Smoke billows from a massive fire on Mountain View Drive in Evergreen on Wednesday, August 5.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Fire in Evergreen