The Shot

In photojournalism there is a beloved idea: it’s called the decisive moment. It’s the one magical capture where every piece of the story comes together in one frame that tells the complete story. The absolute master of this is photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson. He said, “The Moment! Once you miss it, it’s gone forever!”

I have seldom seen a truly decisive moment. But in every photo shoot, either for newspapers or weddings or families or portraits, I am looking for something magical. I want one shot that really stands out. One shot where I can feel it down to my toes. And the calm and certainty that comes from knowing, “I got it!”

Last weekend I went to photograph a wedding in St. Louis. I had never visited that city before, so I didn’t have a list of favorite known places I wanted to go to for photos. But I knew I wanted to use the Gateway Arch in at least one photograph. I wanted the iconic. After the wedding ceremony and all the family group photos we realized we had just under two hours until the reception. Lucky for me, I had an adventurous bride and groom, so when I suggested that we take off and just go see if we (and Siri) could find the Arch, they were up for it.

Stepping outside the church, it was immediately obvious we wouldn’t have much time. The storm clouds were gathering in fast. As we drove the skies continued to darken and as we neared the structure we realized the entire area was under construction. Nothing ruins scenic photographs like chain link fences. But I knew if we could just get those elements out of the frame the shot would work.

This is my first image of the Gateway Arch. I photographed this as we parked illegally shooting almost straight up at the sky out of the back seat window of their SUV.

Gateway Arch St Louis

The Gateway Arch, St. Louis. 25 June 2016

This gets rid of all the junk at the bottom, but how to do this with the bride and groom? I’ve decided to share a few SOC (Straight Out [of] Camera) images that show my process for getting the shot at this wedding. There are some beautiful images from this day, but for me, this is the ONE.

So, here is the finished version. This is how I envisioned it in my mind as I was shooting it. I knew I needed to balance the light between the couple and the clouds. I knew I could darken the sky down to get the drama I wanted. And this first test shot above, that let me know that the Arch would have this slightly golden tone against the dark grey sky. The images that follow this one are SOC until we get to the start of my editing process.

Gateway Arch St. Louis Wedding

The Shot.

Got to have flash. I need light on the couple and I hate that tree, it's messing up my clean lines.

Got to have flash. I need light on the couple and I hate that tree, it’s messing up my clean lines.

Got to have flash. I need light on the couple and I hate that tree, it’s messing up my clean lines. So many people seem to think if you don’t like something in the photograph you just “photoshop” it out. The best photoshop in the world is the photographer behind the camera. Move. So many times a person can change their location, their angle… Use your feet to help you eliminate detracting elements rather than trying to “fix it” in photoshop.

I made them stand on a bench for these. The goal was to get above the messy construction on the ground and focus on them and the sky. This shot is closer, but I hate the lamp post.

I made them stand on a bench for these. The goal was to get above the messy construction on the ground and focus on them and the sky. This shot is closer, but I hate the lamp posts.

Not quite… I failed to give the top of the Arch enough space around it.

This is it. The SOC version of the Shot.

This is it. The SOC version of the Shot. Notice all the crap at the bottom? That’s what I needed to get rid of most.

First adjustment. I edit for the sky I want. And then use the history tool in photoshop to taken information from this and paint it in.

First adjustment. I edit for the sky I want. And then use the history tool in photoshop to taken information from this and paint it in.

The couple with the darkened sky using the history tool.

The couple with the darkened sky using the history tool. I also used the paint brush tool and jet black to delete cars and other noise at the bottom of the frame.

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Use curves and then history tool to lighten the couple.

Gateway Arch St. Louis Wedding

The Shot. The last adjustment was minor. Their skin seemed a bit yellow to me, so I used hue/saturation in photoshop to make the reds, more red and less yellow.

I have so many more photos from this day that I am working on. Beautiful moments. Great dancing at the reception! (I love to photograph dancers!) An amazing ceremony at a Maronite Catholic Church with a crowning ceremony the likes of which I have never seen before. But when I think back on this wedding, this is the image that will come to mind for me. The soldier and his bride beneath the Gateway Arch. I’ll think back on this, and smile…

This was a very good day.

Congratulations to Robert and Ashley. May God bless your lives.

If you are interested in more of my work you can find my portfolio at: www.brendaahearn.com

 

stadium baseball fire montana

Skip Willett looks over the destruction of the Sapa-Johnsrud Babe Ruth Field stadium on Tuesday morning, June 28, in Columbia Falls.

The hardest days to be a photographer are ones when you have to photograph someone’s tragedy.

Last night a fire in a dumpster (possibly fireworks set off by kids) led to a fully engulfed structure fire that destroyed the Sapa-Johnsrud Babe Ruth Field stadium in Columbia Falls. The stadium was built in 1989 by community volunteers like Bob Smith. He stands in the field, looking at the shell of what they had done and sadly states, “What a shame.” Smith looks up at the roof, now charred and black and gaping with holes, and remembers being up there and working on the roof.

photojournalism frame shot fire montana

This was my favorite photo of the day. It’s a frame shot using the burnt out structure to draw attention to Ray Queen, right, Nancy Underdahl, treasurer, another other on-lookers at the scene of structure fire that destroyed the Sapa-Johnsrud Babe Ruth Field late on Monday night, June 27, in Columbia Falls.

The coach, Ray Queen, is there, he paces the infield making calls, gathering and giving information, and starting the process of starting over. “It’s so ironic,” said Queen. “The last game we played here was Sunday. We played Kalispell and were winning 16-0 by the end of the third inning. The Kalispell team called it quits at that point. We weren’t trying to run up the score. I was out at third base signalling my team, ‘No more steals.'” Is it comforting at all to think that the final game was a victory?

For Queen this day is especially hard. This is what he told Daily Inter Lake reporter Katheryn Houghton:
The Sapa-Johnsrud Babe Ruth Field was named in memory of two former players who had gone to the Babe Ruth World Series in 1983, Jimmy Sapa and and Ray Johnsrud.
A year after the team went to the series, the two players died in a collision with a train while driving home from a baseball practice.
“I had played with them until their tragic death,” Queen said. “This fire makes it feel like that’s happening all over again.”

coach baseball stadium fire ruins

Ray Queen stops to have a portrait taken in front of the ruins of the Sapa-Johnsrud Babe Ruth Field stadium on Tuesday, June 28, in Columbia Falls.

In the scope of possible tragedies, this one is not as severe as a life lost. And yet, this is an emotional day for people. And coming in to photograph a painful moment in someone’s life is never easy. On the one hand, the paper has to have a photograph of this. The field is a landmark for the community and we can’t just ignore its destruction. We, the members of the news media, console ourselves and hope that our stories and photographs will inspire community members to get involved, donate time or money or resources, to help with the rebuild. But that doesn’t make taking the pictures easier.

For me, in these moments I feel like the worst kind of vulture. I feel like the photographic version of an ambulance-chaser. I feel guilty. I have a job to do, but I hate it. The question is, how to do this compassionately? How to do this job and keep my humanity? And for me, introvert that I am, the answer is rather unexpected. It’s to talk. Talk with the people. Don’t jump in with the hard-hitting questions. Show a little sympathy. I personally have no connection to this place, but I can feel empathy for what they’ve lost and for all the mess they’ll have to clean up. Don’t ask for stories like you’re trying to get the scoop, but let them tell their stories, so they can share and feel heard. And then get to work. Start taking photos. Details, overviews, people if they’ll let you. That way, when you express sorrow for having to ask these questions and take these pictures, they’ll forgive you and say, “It’s ok. You’re just doing your job.”

fire line do not cross stadium fire baseball montana

Detail of the fire line tape put up to keep people out o the ruined Sapa-Johnsrud Babe Ruth Field stadium on Tuesday, June 28, in Columbia Falls.

UPDATE:

This is why community journalism is great. In the morning I photographed the fire. In the afternoon I saw the team out doing a fundraiser car wash. I stopped to get more photos and we are going to run this photo with the fundraising information that they didn’t have yesterday when all this was unfolding. I also learned at the car was that the league did not have insurance on the structure, they are going to have to raise all the funds. I called my boss, we added that to the story. It’s important information and I get to be part of helping get the word out. Even the hardest days are great days when you get to do something good.

baseball field fire fundraiser Montana

Austyn Andrachick, front to back, Hunter Palmer, and Trenton Tyree (on PalmerÕs shoulders) and other team members wave to cars to invite them to their fundraiser carwash on Tuesday afternoon, June 28, in Whitefish. Ironically the day the community woke up to learn the bleachers at the Sapa-Johnsrud Babe Ruth Fields has been destroyed in a fire the team members were already scheduled to do the fundraiser at the Cenex Zip Trip to help with travel expenses for tournaments.
Babe Ruth President Ray Queen said the field doesn’t have any structural insurance. That means the costs of repairs will have to be met by the league. Fundraisers are still in the discussion phase but there is a GoFundMe page through which the league is trying to raise $30,000.
People can donate by visiting: https://www.gofundme.com/sapa-johnsrud
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

If you are so inclined to help out with this effort check out: https://www.gofundme.com/sapa-johnsrud

Glacier Wedding

Glacier National Park wedding

May is a risky month for weddings in Montana. Some days are warm and sunny, some are cold and beautiful, and a lot of days are rainy and dower. There is little in May that can be described as predictable. So it’s touchy scheduling wedding May weddings. The simple truth is, you never know what you are going to get.

Armed Forces Day weddingA few days ago I photographed the wedding of my friend Collin and his bride Miss Liz. We had a perfect day in Glacier National Park with soft light and overcast but dry skies. We didn’t get the dramatic light and bold colors we were all hoping for, but neither did we get doused and that was a win for everyone.

It was the day before that was craziness…

bride and mother

On Friday I was on the phone with both Collin and Liz. I wanted to make sure they didn’t need any last minute details taken care of by me. When I called Miss Liz she was tied in knots about the weather and the predictions for an incoming storm. She didn’t want to cause problems for anyone of the guest, but neither did she want to give up her dream of getting married in Glacier.

Lake McDonald, Glacier National Park wedding

For my part, the answer was pretty obvious, go with Glacier. Even if we get rained on. Even if it isn’t what you dreamed of. Buy umbrellas (they bought a dozen clear umbrellas) and go for Glacier and hope for the best.

Armed Forces Day wedding

And the best is what they got. They had there ceremony on the banks of Lake McDonald, bright flowers at the Lodge added a touch of color, and the overcast skies made taking photos at 1230 in the afternoon not a complete photography nightmare. And, as an added bonus, the couple decided to hold two ceremonies. One at Glacier, and then a second at their wedding reception for the people who couldn’t get to the park. More photo ops for me.  😉

happiness

I so love that one of the reasons they considered not going to Glacier was out of concern for me and my gear. I am also outrageously happy I was able to tell both these wonderful people that I was good to go and we should take the chance on the mountains and the park.

And it worked. The gamble paid off.

ring detail

One moment I will not soon forget was driving home from the reception, looking south and seeing the storm front moving in. The rains kindly waited until this wedding day was complete. It makes a photographer smile…

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography wedding dress

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

here comes the bride

best man

Lake McDonald wedding

with this ring

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

groomsmen

bridesmaids

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Glacier National Park wedding

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Montana Veterans Home chapel

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Montana Veterans Home chapel

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Montana Veterans Home chapel

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Photos by Brenda Ahearn Photography

Wedding Portfolio

For weeks my life has been consumed with preparing my wedding portfolio. It’s been a long time since I have made one of these and sorting through thousands of photographs was not an easy task. I’ve decided to share a few of my favorite pages from my new 8.5 inch square album here.

Also, I’m going to give a small plug to Mixbook. I am not an affiliate of theirs and I don’t make any money or get any rewards for this, I simply want to say something good about a good product. The album I created is one of their premium lay-flat books. I chose the 8.5 square layout and I love it. The pages are a strong and thick, the color reproduction of the photos in the books are excellent. This is something I am going to be proud to show off to potential clients.

I have gone with companies that charge hundreds of dollars on albums. I once paid $500+ for an album. And I’ll admit, it was gorgeous. Really. A work of art. But not worth the price for me. I don’t make albums for clients anymore except by special request, but a lot of clients seem to want to save the money and make their own. I have no qualms about sending people to mixbook. This is my third album with them, and I am well pleased with this product.

Here are some of the pages I designed for my book. If you want to see more I have almost the whole thing up on my wedding blog: wedding portfolio

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2015 Year in Review: part one – Photojournalism

View from atop the Evergreen Fire and Rescue ladder truck of a fire on Mountain View Drive in Evergreen on Wednesday, August 5. The helicopter is from the Department of Natural Resources and Conservation. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake) (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

It would be difficult to pick a non-fire related photo to start with because the 2015 fire season was one for the record books. This is from the massive Evergreen fire in August.

Welcome to a brand new year! In true procrastinator style I have waited for the end of 2015 to write up my reflections on the year. In my defense, I don’t really feel my year is over. Personally, I have always counted my birthday (April 4) as my year, so by my reckoning I still have three months left. 🙂

This is the year I turned 40. That number seems impossible. I can remember being a child. My mother had this framed saying that she had cross-stiched which read: “Life begins at 40.” I can actually remember thinking, “Forty is ancient. How could anybody live to be that old?” Only now, I don’t feel ancient. I feel like life is just beginning. I wanted 40 to be memorable, and it has certainly been that. In many ways this has been one of the best years of my life. I’m excited for 2016, but I wonder how it could ever top 2015…

Still, the best day is the next day and I am so looking forward to what’s coming. But for right now, I have to stop and give a word of thanks for all the ways I was blessed this year.

A view of the Northern Lights over Lake McDonald at 11:56 p.m. on Thursday, April 9, in Glacier National Park. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

A view of the Northern Lights over Lake McDonald at 11:56 p.m. on Thursday, April 9, in Glacier National Park. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

My biggest news was this: For my sixth anniversary here in Montana I created a video retrospective of some of my favorite shots from my time here. I combined this with a song I fell in love with by Mike Murray called Bury Me in Montana (if you’re interested you can find it on iTunes on his album Tumbleweed). As of today the video has been seen 130,000 times.

If you want to see it, it’s at the top of my Brenda Ahearn Photography page on facebook. https://www.facebook.com/BrendaAhearnPhotography/

The other major milestone for me this year was having on of my photos published in Time magazine. It’s a bit odd, the way things hit me. I’ve been working full time for a newspaper since 2002. And I’ve been seeing my work get printed since 1996. One would think that after so much time, I would be pretty well immune to the thrill of seeing my work in print. Not so. I still get a kick out of it. I love it when I get the front page of the paper I work for. Or even one of the inside pages. All I really care about is that the printing looks good and thanks to our press guys most of the time, the prints look very good. I love it when I find the AP has picked up one of my photos and it went out nationwide or even worldwide. I’ve had photos show up in some pretty major papers. My favorite was five years ago when I got my first photo in USA Today. Ironically USA Today isn’t delivered in Montana. Go figure. Still, it was a thrill. And this this year… Wow. It started with an email: would I be interested in having one of my photos considered for publication in Time magazine. Hell YES!!!! Except, of course, I wrote something far more professional in response. And come to find out they loved the photo and wanted it. Were even willing to pay the Inter Lake fee to get it. After all, I shot the photo while on assignment for the DIL so I don’t own the rights to it. They lady at Time graciously sent me 5 copies of the magazine. It’s the October issue with Pope Frances on the front. I am so honored.

Copies of the magazine sent to me courtesy of Time, as well as the photo they published with a story on the popularity of adventure racing.

Copies of the magazine sent to me courtesy of Time, as well as the photo they published with a story on the popularity of adventure racing.

This year I photographed 14 families, 2 surprise engagements in Glacier, and 9 weddings. I got to see the Pacific ocean for the first time in too many years and I got to be a part of two of the best swing dance workshops ever followed by a trek to Seattle and some photos of the ones I love out there.

This was also one of the most epic years I’ve had medically. Three hospitalizations. I broke my left arm in April. I had surgery in June. And after photographing fire season in September I ended up in the ER with the most dangerous asthma attack of my life. But I survived. And as I look back at the fear and pain they only make grateful for this incredible life.

Now…how to organize all this? I’ve narrowed it down to my top 100 photos. And that was painful to do. But it’s still too much. So I am going to post these over the next three days. First off will be all my newspaper work. This includes my Scenics from Montana because frankly, our readers love them, and I’m lucky enough to work at a newspaper that let’s me put these kinds of pretty pictures in the paper. Then photos from the music and entertainment world. And finally, weddings and family stuff.

To everyone who shared this year with me, the good and the bad, thank you. I am so sincerely grateful.
Much love,
Bren

A large snow covered gate makes a frame for a winter scenic near Echo Lake on Thursday morning, January 8. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Yellow Bay at Flathead Lake

Structure Fire in Evergreen

Glacier National Park

A singing Valentine's from Classic Touch

These two images started with a text from a Deputy that read: Truck in water in Bigfork. I never mind getting woken up at 2 a.m. when I get photos like this out of it.

These two images started with a text from a Deputy that read: Truck in water in Bigfork. I never mind getting woken up at 2 a.m. when I get photos like this out of it.

 

One year anniversary for ImagineIF Library

Eric Michael Krop, one of my favorite local talents.

Eric Michael Krop, one of my favorite local talents.

 

Playing in Puddles

A view of the Northern Lights over Lake McDonald at 11:56 p.m. on Thursday, April 9, in Glacier National Park.

A view of the Northern Lights over Lake McDonald at 11:56 p.m. on Thursday, April 9, in Glacier National Park.

 

2015news_0012

John Dunnigan at the Great Northern Bar in Whitefish, on Thursday, May 14. In the middle of a portrait session Dunnigan looked up, saw a friend and had to wave.

John Dunnigan at the Great Northern Bar in Whitefish, on Thursday, May 14. In the middle of a portrait session Dunnigan looked up, saw a friend and had to wave.

Of my photos of John Dunnigan this was my favorite. But for those who know his personality, the first image is more authentically him.

Of my photos of John Dunnigan this was my favorite. But for those who know his personality, the first image is more authentically him.

 

Structure fire in Columbia Falls. May 2015.

Structure fire in Columbia Falls. May 2015.

 

Memorial Day 2015

A view of Kalispell at sunset from the forth story tower of the Kalispell Fire Department downtown station on Wednesday, May 27.

A view of Kalispell at sunset from the forth story tower of the Kalispell Fire Department downtown station on Wednesday, May 27.

 

Snow in June in Glacier National Park. Oh how I love life in Montana.

Snow in June in Glacier National Park. Oh how I love life in Montana.

 

"Gramma" Jean Livesay, 86, gets a hug from her neighbor James Francis on Friday morning, June 12, in Kalispell. Jean has been waving to students from the window of her Wyoming Street home for two years. For the last week of school she made a sign for her front yard and for Friday, the last day of school, she moved from her window to her front yard to wave at students and parents as they pass by.

“Gramma” Jean Livesay, 86, gets a hug from her neighbor James Francis on Friday morning, June 12, in Kalispell. Jean has been waving to students from the window of her Wyoming Street home for two years. For the last week of school she made a sign for her front yard and for Friday, the last day of school, she moved from her window to her front yard to wave at students and parents as they pass by.

 

I know photographically this photo isn't much. But the story was fantastic. I mean really, how often does one hear the words "airborne" and "minivan" together? The van went off the road, went airborne, and landed on top of the red car. It was funny but that's mainly because no one was seriously hurt.

I know photographically this photo isn’t much. But the story was fantastic. I mean really, how often does one hear the words “airborne” and “minivan” together? The van went off the road, went airborne, and landed on top of the red car. It was funny but that’s mainly because no one was seriously hurt.

 

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A view of the main runway at Glacier Park International Airport. I am amazed sometimes at all the places my work takes me to...places that most people never get to see.

A view of the main runway at Glacier Park International Airport. I am amazed sometimes at all the places my work takes me to…places that most people never get to see.

 

Daniel Kirk's ordination as the new priest for Saint Herman’s.

Daniel Kirk’s ordination as the new priest for Saint Herman’s. I wrote the story for the paper on this one as well as doing the photos. To see more of it go to: https://brendaahearn.wordpress.com/2015/08/14/too-close-to-the-story/

 

A view of the Reynolds Creek Fire near East Glacier on Wednesday, July 22.

A view of the Reynolds Creek Fire near East Glacier on Wednesday, July 22.

 

Steampunk family in downtown Kalispell.

Steampunk family in downtown Kalispell.

 

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The Evergreen fire. August 2015.

The Evergreen fire. August 2015.

 

Smoke from the Thompson Fire in Glacier National Park pours into the sky in this view from Lost Creek Road and Farm-to-Market Road in West Valley. This photo got picked up by the Associated Press and ended up in USA Today. Ironically, this photo was used nationally to illustrate the wildfires in California.

Smoke from the Thompson Fire in Glacier National Park pours into the sky in this view from Lost Creek Road and Farm-to-Market Road in West Valley.
This photo got picked up by the Associated Press and ended up in USA Today. Ironically, this photo was used nationally to illustrate the wildfires in California.

 

Marston Fire

I'm flying in a Blackhawk photographing this Blackhawk. Life is so awesome.

I’m flying in a Blackhawk photographing this Blackhawk. Life is so awesome.

 

This was my first photo back on the job after being in the ER for the most severe asthma attack of my life. Clean blue skies never meant so much to me before.

This was my first photo back on the job after being in the ER for the most severe asthma attack of my life. Clean blue skies never meant so much to me before.

 

One of the most devastating wrecks I have ever seen: The driver of a Budweiser truck takes a moment off to the side of a collision with a Ford f250 truck on September 9, at the intersection of U.S. 93 and Farm-to-Market Road north of Whitefish.

One of the most devastating wrecks I have ever seen: The driver of a Budweiser truck takes a moment off to the side of a collision with a Ford f250 truck on September 9, at the intersection of U.S. 93 and Farm-to-Market Road north of Whitefish.

 

Benghazi Memorial 9/11 ceremony in Bigfork Montana. This was the second year for the event and this year featured a former member of the CIA and founder of the organization DeliverFund, which is a group of former special forces operators now dedicated to rescuing victims of sex trafficking.

Benghazi Memorial 9/11 ceremony in Bigfork Montana. This was the second year for the event and this year featured a former member of the CIA and founder of the organization DeliverFund, which is a group of former special forces operators now dedicated to rescuing victims of sex trafficking. I have written a blog about these guys and their work: https://brendaahearn.wordpress.com/2015/12/03/do-something-good-in-the-world/

 

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Serene Scene along the Flathead River

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Montana Life: Scarecrow Sue

Fall Feature

A colorful sunrise lights up the sky from Fairmont and Kinshella Road east of Kalispell on Thursday morning, October 22. I posted both of these photos to the Daily Inter Lake Facebook page and we let the readers pick which one would run in the paper. The top photo was the hands-down winner.

A colorful sunrise lights up the sky from Fairmont and Kinshella Road east of Kalispell on Thursday morning, October 22.
I posted both of these photos to the Daily Inter Lake Facebook page and we let the readers pick which one would run in the paper. The top photo was the hands-down winner.

 

Fire in Evergreen

2015news_0042

Last year I wrote a story about USMC Captain Wayne Bolton. This year for Christmas Wayne ended up recovering from triple-bypass surgery. But he wasn't alone for the holidays. The Marines turned out to Celebrate Christmas with him. Semper Fi!

Last year I wrote a story about USMC Captain Wayne Bolton. This year for Christmas Wayne ended up recovering from triple-bypass surgery. But he wasn’t alone for the holidays. The Marines turned out to Celebrate Christmas with him. Semper Fi!    Here is a link to the story of Wayne, one of the survivors of the Battle of the Chosin Reservoir, Korea: https://brendaahearn.wordpress.com/2014/11/27/remembering-chosin/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today I am celebrating six years in Montana. Six years at the Daily Inter Lake. I love this place. I love the job. I love my life. And for the past couple of weeks I have been working on a video slideshow and an article for the paper that was published yesterday.

About 24 hours ago I posted my video. Tonight I’m looking at the Facebook stats and honestly I’ve never had anything behave the way this video did. It has reached more than 100,000 people, had 28 thousand views and been shared more than 1000 times. The experience is rather humbling and definitely surreal.

Thank you for your interest in this story. For my blog I am going to focus on photos that didn’t make it into the video. Here is the story that started all this. I hope you enjoy. — Bren

aMontana_Life_Brenda

Photographic Memories
Photos and story by Brenda Ahearn
Layout and design by Seaborn Larson

Tomorrow will be my sixth anniversary as a photographer for the Daily Inter Lake, and I’d like to give readers my personal thank-you note. In my years here I have had many people reach out to me, give me positive feedback and make me feel welcome. I am deeply grateful. But when I think of the people who have made this job such a positive experience, the person I think of first is actually the photographer who had the job before me, Karen Nichols.

Lake McDonald, Glacier National Park at sunrise.

Lake McDonald, Glacier National Park at sunrise.

Karen Nichols is beloved. When I first started working for the Inter Lake, I would go out on assignment and every day, every photo shoot, I would introduce myself and people would say something along the line of: “Oh you’re the new photographer? We LOVE Karen.” They let me know very clearly that I was following in the footsteps of someone great. Karen is a true talent and an amazing person. Every time I heard someone say how much they loved Karen, all I could think was, “Yes. I’m trying my very best.”

Whitefish Lake in Whitefish, Montana.

Whitefish Lake in Whitefish, Montana.

After several months on the job, I got an unexpected phone call from Karen. She invited me out to lunch. I didn’t have many friends at the time, and I remember being really impressed that she would reach out to the new photographer. We went to Gresko’s and as we ate our sandwiches Karen told me she had been watching my work, and that she wanted me to know I was doing a good job. This compliment felt huge. For months all I had heard was how amazing this woman is; to have her tell me I was on the right track was exactly the encouragement I needed.

Flathead National Forest north of Whitefish, Montana.

Flathead National Forest north of Whitefish, Montana.

I told her what I had been hearing, how every person I met seemed to have some story of her, or some compliment of her work. And Karen smiled. She bowed her head a bit and took the compliments I passed on humbly and graciously. I remember thinking that she had true grace. Then she looked back up at me and told me that one day, I would have people who felt that way about me and my work.

A view of Glacier National Park from Swiftcurrent Trail.

A view of Glacier National Park from Swiftcurrent Trail.

That didn’t seem possible at the time, but it became my goal. And now, six years later, I find she was right. I still run into people who love Karen. And they make me smile. But I also run into people who appreciate me. Believe me, when you have bright red hair and a press pass your identity doesn’t remain a secret for long. And that’s OK, because I have had people over and over stop to me to tell me that they like my work.

Dickey Lake north of Whitefish, Montana.

Dickey Lake north of Whitefish, Montana.

I find it sweet when someone sees my name on a form and they get this puzzled look on their faces as they wonder why my name looks so familiar. A couple of times a year I’ll get an email from a firefighter in Ferndale, telling me he’s made one of my photos his new computer background. Once when I was out photographing a car wreck I had a person figure out who I was and start telling me how much they like my photos. I didn’t have a lot of time because I had work to do, but I never forgot that person or the effort they made to let me know my work matters. There are people who call and leave messages. Or write emails. Or send flowers. Once I did a portrait of a World War II veteran. He was so pleased he sent the reporter and me each a box of chocolates.

Sunset in North Glacier near Polebridge, Montana.

Sunset in North Glacier near Polebridge, Montana.

These people do more than offer a pat on the back; they remind me of some important truths:

1. Community journalism is the best. When I was a young photographer I met a famous photographer to the stars. He said something that shaped the direction of my life. He told me that what we must not forget is that photography is about people, places and things. He said as you climb the ladder the people get more famous, the places get more exotic and the things get more expensive, but they are still just people, places and things. He said if he had understood that when he was young, he would have stayed at a smaller newspaper where he could really be a part of the community and use his talent and position to make a difference. I love living and working in the Flathead Valley because this is a place where I feel I can make a difference.

2. A photo in the newspaper is a big deal. I’ve been working for newspapers since 1997. When you are in this business it’s easy to get to a point where a front page photo is just another day in the life. However, it is a very big deal to the person who is in the photograph. Because of my job I have gotten to meet some incredible people and be part of telling amazing stories. It is a daily challenge and a daily responsibility. There are a lot of aspects about this job that are fun, but there are aspects that are important. And doing the job well is important.

3. “Work is a blessing.” My grandmother used to say this. When I applied for this job I was one of more than a hundred applicants. And the other photographer at the time let me know I was not the first choice. But the first choice said no, and so here I am. Over the years I have become the senior photographer for the Inter Lake, and my Grams was right, my work has been a blessing.

It’s a blessing I am grateful for. I love where I get to live and love what I get to do. I meet people who challenge me, inspire me, fill me with respect and push me to live life more fully. That’s the best part of working at a newspaper.

Boats on the dock at Lake McDonald in Glacier National Park.

Boats on the dock at Lake McDonald in Glacier National Park.

Last year while on assignment for the Inter Lake’s This Week in the Flathead publication, I was photographing the Northwest Artist Syndicate’s singer/songwriter competition. That was the first time I heard Mike Murray sing “Bury Me in Montana.” The song wrapped around my brain and instantly stole my heart. When I started thinking of how I wanted to share a look back at my years here, I knew it had to be a slide show and it had to have Mike’s song as the sound track. Here is the link to the video: https://www.facebook.com/BrendaAhearnPhotography/videos/1658748397701285/?fref=nf

Double rainbow over Flathead Lake from Lakeside, Montana.

Double rainbow over Flathead Lake from Lakeside, Montana.

Thank you to every person who has let me photograph them, and every person who has written or called or just said “well done” in passing. You mean more to me than you know.

Sunset south of Whitefish, Montana.

Sunset south of Whitefish, Montana.

I spent a lot of years hoping I would find a newspaper that I could settle down at, a place where I could build a life and stick around for 20-plus years. I think I finally found it.

Super moon over Flathead Lake, from Rollins, Montana.

Super moon over Flathead Lake, from Rollins, Montana.

Aerial view of Glacier National Park.

Aerial view of Glacier National Park.

Flathead National Forest north of Whitefish, Montana.

Flathead National Forest north of Whitefish, Montana.

Sunrise at Dickey Lake, north of Whitefish, Montana.

Sunrise at Dickey Lake, north of Whitefish, Montana.

Sunset at Whitefish Lake with a view of Big Mountain.

Sunset at Whitefish Lake with a view of Big Mountain.

Storm over Creston, Montana.

Storm over Creston, Montana.

Sunrise view north of Kalispell, Montana.

Sunrise view north of Kalispell, Montana.

Winter sunset near Polebridge, Montana.

Winter sunset near Polebridge, Montana.

Too Close to the Story

Bishop Maxim blesses the new temple in a service at Saint Herman Orthodox Church on Sunday, July 19, in Kalispell. More than 100 clergy, members and guests were at the historic service where the Rev. Daniel Kirk was ordained to be the priest for Saint HermanÕs and became the first Orthodox priest to be ordained the in the state of Montana.  (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Bishop Maxim blesses the new temple in a service at Saint Herman Orthodox Church on Sunday, July 19, in Kalispell. More than 100 clergy, members and guests were at the historic service where the Rev. Daniel Kirk was ordained to be the priest for Saint HermanÕs and became the first Orthodox priest to be ordained the in the state of Montana.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

I love my work. A few weeks ago I got to attend the first Orthodox ordination in the state of Montana. If you are not familiar with Orthodoxy, it is complex, ornate, exquisite, formal. It’s beautiful. It makes the traditionalist in me very happy, even if does run a bit on the long side.

Mostly my work is just images. I have to gather enough information to write up the photo captions, but the reporting of stories, isn’t my job. And I like it this way. But sometimes, it just seems to make sense that I write the story as well as photograph it. This ordination became one of these cases. It was a two hour ceremony on a Sunday (both photographers at our newspaper have Sundays off and as many reporters as can have off, take the day, so we have a bit of a skeleton crew on Sundays. I had to go because I wanted to photograph it. But reporters can do a lot of their job over the phone or after the fact. Photographers must be there.

When I got back to the office and started going through all the images, I realized there was so much information, not just visually, but with all the traditions, the decorations, the cultures. I felt as though I had to tell this, because I was the only member of the Inter Lake who saw it. I made it my project, my responsibility.

And…I got too close to the story.

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

My editor gave me an 800 word limit. This is a lot. The last story I did, I was granted 300 words. Yikes. How do you explain the entire Orthodox experience in 800 words? It can’t be done. At least, that is what I convinced myself of.

When you get too close to the story, you loose perspective. It’s like looking at one of those painting that uses the pointillism technique. From a distance you get the whole picture, up close, it’s all just a bunch of chaos and individual specs. I got too close. I got so wrapped up in the details that I didn’t actually find the story until the very end. My word count, just under 2,600. Five pages. WAY too long to print in a newspaper.

So, not one, but two editors worked their magic and created a much shorter version of this story. As soon as I have the link I’ll share it here:

But even though it’s too long and I am too close, there is something about the longer version that I still like. I’m still proud of this. Still glad I got to explore both the written and visual side of this experience. Since this version will never be printed, I figured it is just about perfect for a blog.

I hope you enjoy it. And forgive me…it’s very long.

A detail of one of the icons in the newly constructed iconostasis. This large wooden screen was built by Joshua Hicks of Polson and incorporates some distinctively American features. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

A detail of one of the icons in the newly constructed iconostasis. This large wooden screen was built by Joshua Hicks of Polson and incorporates some distinctively American features.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Orthodox Ordination
Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake

Daniel Kirk, 29,is a seventh-generation Montanan, raised on a ranch near Cardwell, Montana and homeschooled. He is also the first Eastern Orthodox priest to be ordained in the state of Montana.

Kirk got his start with Holy Trinity Orthodox Church in Butte.

“Holy Trinity is an old parish, 113 years old. When I considered the priesthood I never thought about being a first on any level,” Kirk said. “Priests have come and served in Montana, but none of them have been ordained here. For me, this is a unique blessing.”

“When I began to feel I might have a call to the priesthood there was a natural draw for me to return home and serve here,” Kirk said. “In Orthodoxy I felt I had found my spiritual home and I wanted to bring that to Montana, but honestly I never thought it would happen. In the old world it is common that one of your neighbors would receive the call and become the local pastor. In American, we don’t seem to have that because we are such a transient society. Added to that, there is the size of the diocese. Our diocese, which has its cathedral in Los Angeles covers the state of Alaska, from the northern border of the continental United States down to the southern border of Mexico and from Colorado all the way over to Hawaii, is geographically one of the largest in the world, and yet there are only 40 parishes. So you go where there is a need, and for Anne and I, there was a need here.”

Bishop Maxim of the Serbian Orthodox diocese of Western America is greeting by the crowd gathered outside Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19, for the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk, the first priest to serve at Saint Herman and the first Orthodox priest to be ordained in the state of Montana. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Bishop Maxim of the Serbian Orthodox diocese of Western America is greeting by the crowd gathered outside Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19, for the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk, the first priest to serve at Saint Herman and the first Orthodox priest to be ordained in the state of Montana.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

In the beginning

Tikhon Hanlon, a founding member of Kalispell’s parish, moved to Kalispell in 2010.

According to Hanlon, it all began with two families. The Cook family in Eureka had been in touch with Father Russell in Butte. Hanlon said he also got in touch with Russell, asking if there were any Orthodox parishes in the area.

There were not, and so a group of five people began gathering weekly for reader services. In Eastern Orthodox tradition, a reader service is conducted when no priest is available. It is an abbreviated version of Sunday service that consists of liturgical reading, reading of the Psalms, and choir and worship songs.

In the summer of 2011, Father Russell traveled to Kalispell to lead four nights of introduction to Orthodoxy classes in the basement of Colter Coffee. Attendance varied, but following the class the number of faithful gathering weekly grew to 7 or 8, and it has continued to grow slowly but steadily since. The parish currently has 60-65 regular members.

“We didn’t have the Eucharist, the part of a Christian ceremony commemorating the Last Supper; we really didn’t know what we were doing,” Hanlon said.

The process of becoming an officially recognized Eastern Orthodox parish is complex. The founding members didn’t select a name until they reached the first stage in the life of a church, which is to become an officially recognized satellite church, in this case, a satellite of Butte’s Holy Trinity.

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

“When a parish is founded in the Orthodox Church it requires the effort of everyone; the entire diocese is involved,” Kirk said. “One diocese is considered a ‘local church.’ So when we say this has involved the whole local church, that means the Bishop, the clergy, and all the faithful praying and contributing. It takes a whole diocese for one new parish to begin.”

A satellite parish isn’t on the books of the diocese. Rather it is acknowledged as dependent on another church. When the Kalispell group reached this stage, it took on the name Saint Herman Orthodox Church.

According to Hanlon, the founders here always had an affinity for St. Herman of Alaska. He is called one of the “Enlighteners of America.” St. Herman came from Russia in the early 19th century. He and a group of Russian Orthodox monks traveled from Finland across Russia and the Bering Strait to Alaska, which was at the time a colony of imperial Russia. St. Herman is seen as an apostle to the American people. As a result of his missionary work, there are even today a large number of Native Americans in Alaska who practice Orthodoxy.

“In this parish we are primarily converts and we feel his vision and intercession for us,” Kirk said.

The Re. Daniel Kirk before receiving his ordination and vestments on Sunday, July 19, at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

The Re. Daniel Kirk before receiving his ordination and vestments on Sunday, July 19, at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Kirk’s connection to the St. Herman community began in the summer of 2011. He was attending seminary at Saint Tikhon’s Orthodox Theological Seminary in South Canaan, Pennsylvania and returning to serve in Montana during the summers. As he progressed through training, he became connected with St. Herman through Holy Trinity.

In 2014, Bishop Maxim traveled to Butte to celebrate the Pentecost feast in May. A group of delegates from St. Herman’s traveled to Butte at the same time to present a letter of petition to formally establish St. Herman as a mission parish within the diocese.

A mission parish is the intermediate stage in the life of a church, when the diocese recognizes the church as a fledgling parish. The group is given time and support to procure a building and begin full services. St. Herman was approved that day.

A mission parish gets seven years to procure a building, gather finances to afford the salary for a priest, and then secure a full-time priest. St. Herman accomplished all these steps in one year.

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

“It’s so surprising,” Hanlon said. “From the beginning it’s all been a surprise that people come to our home, would show up on a regular basis, that we would grow the way we have. I always believed it would take a decade to get a parish and a priest here in Kalispell.”

“That’s common,” Kirk agreed. “It can take a lot of time to get used to the name and concept, to have a group of believers grow into a parish in a place as diverse as this. The way things have progressed so quickly here is rare.”

In 2014, Kirk was ordained as a deacon and assigned to Holy Trinity. As an assistant to Father Russell he was able to come to Kalispell and get to know the parish from its start as a satellite parish.

“I felt drawn here,” Kirk said. “I grew to love and appreciate the dedicated people here.”

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

During Lent of this year, St. Herman saw its biggest growth spurt. A representative of Bishop Maxim visited St. Herman’s. Father Predrag, a diocesan dean, came just before “Pascha,” the feast of the resurrection of the Lord, celebrated on April 12 according to the Orthodox calendar. Father Predrag reported back that St. Herman was ready to take the next step and have a priest of its own. At the same time, he informed the bishop of the special relationship that had developed between the Kirk family and the people of St. Herman.

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

“We had been hoping it would work out exactly like this,” Tikhon said. “You don’t want to presume. You don’t want to invest too much into what you are hoping will happen because you don’t want to be disappointed.”

Yet all admit that while they were hoping and praying for God to move and work his plan according to His will, it seemed impossible that Kirk’s path to becoming a priest and St. Herman’s path to becoming a parish could ever be brought into perfect alignment.

“That is part of the unique blessing of all this,” Kirk said. “We couldn’t do this. We couldn’t make this happen. Only God could have brought things together in such a way. There are so many ways things can go wrong. We felt God’s providence and St. Herman’s intercession for countless details that needed to fall precisely into place.”

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Within days of receiving Father Predrag’s report, Bishop Maxim approved his recommendation. St. Herman’s congregation was ecstatic. And then the reality of the time crunch set in; Bishop Maxim gave them until mid-July to have everything in order for Kirk’s ordination and for the blessing of the new temple.

Work began in May. The church owned a building that was being rented by another church, but the Orthodox style is so specific that the entire building had to be gutted, renovated and redone. Stadium-style seating that was bolted to the floor and a baptismal fount had to be completely removed. New floors, carpets, paint, and a ceiling were all needed. The main feature is a new iconostasis.

A photograph from behind the iconostasis by acolyte of the church Walter Keathley. Keathley, who is not a member of clergy, received a special blessing to go behind the iconostasis and capture this photograph. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

A photograph from behind the iconostasis by acolyte of the church Walter Keathley. Keathley, who is not a member of clergy, received a special blessing to go behind the iconostasis and capture this photograph.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

St. Herman’s iconostasis dominates the interior of the temple. The iconostasis is a wooden screen featuring multiple icons, separating where the congregation stands from the alter. Only priests and deacons or those who have been given a special blessing may pass through the screen.

Joshua Hicks, of Polson, built the iconostasis at St. Herman. Hicks converted to the Orthodox Christian faith last year. He also built the iconostasis for St. Anthony Orthodox Church in Bozeman.

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Having Hicks build this for St. Herman is yet another of the unique blessings Father Daniel sees in the story of this church.

“An iconostasis is so unfamiliar in this country. Often churches will have no choice but to order them from overseas,” Kirk said.

Having a local craftsman do the work gave the parish the opportunity to incorporate some American elements into their screen, like a carved pineapple, a symbol of hospitality and welcome.

This American touch is particularly significant to Kirk.

“As Orthodoxy expanded and evangelized it became part of the local communities and cultures,” Kirk said. “The parish works to engage the local community, to reach out and transform. Yet as it reaches out, it is also transformed by the specific people who convert.”

The center of the Eastern Orthodox Christian Church is still located in Istanbul, but there are 14 independent Orthodox churches — including Serbian, like St. Herman — Russian, Greek and others, in the United States.

“Istanbul is considered the first among equals,” Kirk said. “What we hope to see, as the church in America grows, is the same kind of transformation in these American parishes that was seen in the past. What we hope to have someday is an American Orthodox.”

“Today it is not uncommon for an Orthodox priest in the United States to be asked if he is Muslim. Often when a priest speaks of being Orthodox, the first question is to inquire if he is an Orthodox Jew,” Kirk said. “Our hope is that Orthodox Christianity will become a serious contributor to the shape of American culture, and to be recognizable as fundamentally connected to America in terms of its symbols, customs and appearance.”

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Renovations to St. Herman were complete on July 17. Bishop Maxim arrived on July 18 and Father Daniel Kirk was ordained in a Sunday morning service on July 19.

On July 18, Bishop Maxim presided over a vespers service, followed by a meet and greet with the congregation over local craft beers from the Flathead Lake Brewing Company. Bishop Maxim also gifted St. Herman with an 800-year-old relic. A relic can be the earthly remains of a saint, such as bones, or even the clothing or vestments. Bishop Maxim gave St. Herman a relic of a great Serbian monastic saint, St. Peter of Korisha.

“In the church, both time and space are mingled together in the body of Christ to become united,” Kirk explained. “This gift is a manifestation of the conviction that Christ is in the 800-year-old relic, and Christ is in the modern church in America. We are one.”

On July 19, St. Herman Orthodox Church celebrated its first divine liturgy, which is another name for a regular service requiring a priest.

A censor disperses incense into the air during a service at Saint Herman Orthodox Church on Sunday, July 19, in Kalispell. "Incense is a physical offering. It represents the prayers of all the faithful," said the Rev. Daniel Kirk. "It comes from Psalm 141: 'Let my prayer be set forth before thee as incense.'" (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

A censor disperses incense into the air during a service at Saint Herman Orthodox Church on Sunday, July 19, in Kalispell. “Incense is a physical offering. It represents the prayers of all the faithful,” said the Rev. Daniel Kirk. “It comes from Psalm 141: ‘Let my prayer be set forth before thee as incense.'”
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

“The service was beautiful — stunning,” Hanlon said. “Having that many clergy is always an incredible sight because of their vestments and the way they move and interact with one another.”

“Overwhelming is the best word for it. It felt unreal to have the Bishop visiting, to have that many people attending in our new beautiful space. It was invigorating. I felt like we were a thriving church.”

That day, in addition to the service, worship, blessing and consecration of the temple, the clergy and parishioners gathered for the ordination of Father Daniel.

“Our little community has stuck together really nicely all this way, and that has been difficult without a priest,” Hanlon said. “We needed this. We were moving forward, growing, but being without a priest was becoming harder and harder. So it was deeply satisfying to see our ‘stick-to-it-iveness’ pay off so magnificently.”

“It isn’t very often you get everything that you almost didn’t dare to hope for.”

The Rev. Daniel Kirk looks out over the parish during the blessing of the temple on Sunday, July 19, at Saint Herman Orthodox Church. Kirk was ordained later that day. "I was also filled with such joy at the sight of each one of these faces that I have come to know and love," recalls Kirk. "It felt like a little piece of Heaven." (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

The Rev. Daniel Kirk looks out over the parish during the blessing of the temple on Sunday, July 19, at Saint Herman Orthodox Church. Kirk was ordained later that day. “I was also filled with such joy at the sight of each one of these faces that I have come to know and love,” recalls Kirk. “It felt like a little piece of Heaven.”
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

For Father Daniel, the beauty of the day came with both a deep sense of blessing and satisfaction, but also with the weight of responsibility.

“The flow of events could not have worked better in so many ways. When the bishop comes there is always a heightened level of intensity. And with so many visiting clergy members, that added to the day as well. We had visiting Greek, Ukranian, Serbian Orthodox with us and yet there was so much grace present that we really did kind of breathe together. What I mean is there was no stumbling over the individual traditions, we all came together in such unity.”

“When I looked out over the service, seeing the faithful gathered together, I felt fear and overwhelming love,” Kirk added. “The enormity of my responsibility all came rushing in. These people have waited so long, worked so hard to build this parish, to reach this point. And now I am here to serve them.”

He pauses for a moment looking for the words. “I was also filled with such joy at the sight of each one of these faces that I have come to know and love. It felt like a little piece of Heaven.”

The Rev. Daniel Kirk receives his vestments, the robe worn by clergy, on Sunday, July 19. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

The Rev. Daniel Kirk receives his vestments, the robe worn by clergy, on Sunday, July 19.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

What lies ahead

Officially the next step will come when St. Herman is able to give funding and support back to the diocese. At that point they will be elevated to full parish status. But that is the far distant aspiration.

“Our biggest goal is to become a member of this community in Kalispell,” Kirk said. “To open the doors to anyone who is hungry and seeking after Christ. It’s a big responsibility for all of us. It means taking our faith seriously in every aspect of our lives.”

All services at St. Herman are open to the public. There are Great Vespers at 6 p.m. on Saturday evenings, which include a time of prayer and worship music. Sunday morning service begins at 10 a.m. and is generally about two hours long. The church is also holding Wednesday evening vespers at 6:30 p.m., followed by a weekly class on Orthodoxy.

For more information, visit www.sainthermanoc.org.

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Bishop Maxim, head of theÊSerbian Orthodox diocese of Western America, one of the geographically largest diocese in America, takes part in the blessing of the new temple of Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19.

Bishop Maxim, head of theÊSerbian Orthodox diocese of Western America, one of the geographically largest diocese in America, takes part in the blessing of the new temple of Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19.

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Detail of service at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell, on Sunday, July 19. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Detail of service at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell, on Sunday, July 19.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

In the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk the bishop ordains by the 'laying on of hands' a practice from the New Testament. In this a priest is set apart for the celebration of the mysteries of the church. Only an ordained priest can consecrate the elements used in communion. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

In the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk the bishop ordains by the ‘laying on of hands’ a practice from the New Testament. In this a priest is set apart for the celebration of the mysteries of the church. Only an ordained priest can consecrate the elements used in communion.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

The Rev. Daniel Kirk take part in offering communion and blessings for the members of Saint Herman Orthodox Church on Sunday, July 19, in Kalispell. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

The Rev. Daniel Kirk take part in offering communion and blessings for the members of Saint Herman Orthodox Church on Sunday, July 19, in Kalispell.
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: www.sainthermanoc.org (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

Images from the blessing of the temple and the ordination of the Rev. Daniel Kirk at Saint Herman Orthodox Church in Kalispell on Sunday, July 19. For more information on the church visit: http://www.sainthermanoc.org
(Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)